Youth Allowance

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  • Fifteen-year-olds can also receive Youth Allowance if they are defined as independent and are over the school leaving age in the state of residence.
  • If an independent Youth Allowance customer has a partner, then their income will be included under the Partner Income Test.
  • In 2009 a number of significant changes to Youth Allowance were announced in the Federal Budget.
  • Youth Allowance has differing payment rates for recipients who live with a parent or guardian and those who live away from home.
  • However, it is considered to be income for Youth Allowance and other Centrelink payment purposes.
  • Children 16 years or older may alternatively be eligible for Youth Allowance.
  • In 2009 Fielding teamed up with the coalition to defeat the government's proposed changes to the youth allowance system.
  • The underlying philosophy of Youth Allowance is that legal guardians are responsible for supporting their children where they have the means if that young person has not lived independently from them.
  • The previous entry referred to Youth allowance and Parenting Payment.
  • All Youth Allowance recipients are subject to the Personal Income Test, which takes into account any income they may earn through part-time or casual work.
  • The new criteria, Marino believes, forces young people, who live in regional years, to take two gap years, so that they can complete the 18 months work required to get independent youth allowance.
  • Marino believes that "Arbitrary lines on a map now define which students come under which Independent Youth Allowance criteria".
  • People aged below 18 who have not completed their High School education, are usually required to be in full-time education, undertaking an apprenticeship or doing training to be eligible for Youth Allowance.
  • The rationale behind the FAMT is that the taxable income on which Youth Allowance is normally based may not accurately reflect the true financial means of parents in these categories.
  • However, students who were receiving Youth Allowance prior to turning 25 and are still pursuing the same course of study continue to receive Youth Allowance until they finish (or otherwise terminate) their course.
  • A dependent Youth Allowance recipients may be exempt from the Parental Income Test if their parent is in receipt of an income support payment themselves.
  • Youth Allowance is also paid to full-time students aged 16-24, and to full-time Australian Apprenticeship workers aged 16-24.
  • On 31 March 2010 two students were publicly and legally married on the University's lawn in a so-called "marriage of convenience" so that they could both receive full Youth Allowance.
  • Dependent Youth Allowance recipients may also be subject to the Family Actual Means Test (FAMT) which applies where the parent is self-employed, involved in a trust or company or several other categories.
  • Austudy Payment was originally known as the AUSTUDY Scheme, an all-ages study allowance, but since the introduction of Youth Allowance (see above) it has been reserved for the over-25s.
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