writing in The Washington Post

37 examples (0.01 sec)
  • Writing in the Washington Post on the history of email, he asserted that the technology came from many innovators. ...
  • Writing in the Washington Post, Ezra Klein said that the bill had some good ideas but that it would not work.
  • Hal Hinson, writing in The Washington Post, felt the film was too concerned with family-friendliness. ...
  • Writing in The Washington Post, Sally Jenkins called it one of the few significant forward passes thrown in the first season of the forward pass. ...
  • Hal Hinson, writing in The Washington Post said, the film is "so peculiar that one barely knows where to start." ...
  • Writing in the Washington Post, Tom Shales said that the pilot's production was "more movielike than serieslike". ...
  • Steven E. Levingston, also writing in the Washington Post, asserted that the book describes how bad intelligence routinely lead to targeting the wrong individuals.
  • Writing in The Washington Post, Nancy Trejos applauded the hotel's furnishings and convenient location, but felt that it charged too much for some of its services.
  • However, Hal Hinson, writing in The Washington Post felt that Coppola's segment was "by far the director's worst work yet." ...
  • Bill Sheehan writing in the Washington Post finds this latest addition to Cornwell's historical novels to be accurate, coherent, lively and accessible. ...
  • Steven Moore, writing in The Washington Post, has called Gass "the finest prose stylist in America." ...
  • Writing in the Washington Post, Mary McGrory described a statement by Pope John Paul II regarding sexual abuse by priests as a "modified, limited hangout". ...
  • Historian Richard Rhodes, writing in The Washington Post, also criticized the book's sensationalistic reporting of "old news" and its "error-ridden" prose. ...
  • Writing in The Washington Post, Paul Di Filippo described his collection Masque of Dreams as containing "nearly two dozen brilliant stories ranging across all emotional and narrative terrains."
  • Patrick Anderson, writing in The Washington Post, admitted that he "was never a great fan of the Bond books" and considered that "Devil May Care has its amusing and entertaining moments, but there were other moments when I thought it would never end".
  • Nelson Bell, writing in The Washington Post, said that the film was aimed "strictly at thoughtless and ephemeral diversion" while others dismissed the plot as no more than a vehicle for transporting the audience from one musical scene to another. ...
  • Rita Kempley, writing in The Washington Post, called the film "an implausible psycho thriller" and said director Joanou "doesn't have any of his own ideas." ...
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