without cant

19 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Who, without cant, can hear them, and not go out of the meeting-house? Cited from A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers
  • A really interesting book of travels, without cant, and without an eye on the public. Cited from A Vanished Arcadia, by R. B. Cunninghame Graham ]
  • Perhaps -- I say it without cant -- this, perhaps, was all that we possibly asked from heaven. Cited from Confession, by W. Gilmore Simms
  • The Russians were without shame and without cant, saw things as they were, and proceeded to make them a good deal worse. Cited from Potterism, A Tragi-Farcical Tract, by Rose Macaulay
  • The soul's right of wonder is still left to us; and we have righteous praise and doom awarded, assuredly without cant. Cited from The Correspondence of Carlyle and Emerson, Vol. I, Carlyle and Emerson
  • He exhibits in them all great humanity and benevolence, and is emphatically and without cant the poet of religion and morality. Cited from English Literature, by Henry Coppee
  • They were the old guard of the land of Bohemia, where a minister's voice sounded good to them if it was a voice without cant or religious hypocrisy. Cited from T. De Witt Talmage, by T. De Witt Talmage and Mrs. T. De Witt Talmage
  • The Christian life is pictured without cant or exaggeration. Cited from Mr. World and Miss Church-Member, by W. S. Harris
  • She had, in common with her three brothers and her charming sister, the advantage of a wise and loving mother -- a woman pious without cant, and worldly-wise without being worldly. Cited from The International Weekly Miscellany, Vol. 1, No. 7, August 12, 1850
  • Brave without rashness, prudent without timidity, firm without arrogance, resolved without rudeness, good without cant, and virtuous without presumption. Cited from The Life of Francis Marion, by W. Gilmore Simms
  • This large consideration must dispose of small anomalies, such as the acceptance, without cant, of certain forms of the shop, euphemized as the store, but containing the same old vertebral counter. Cited from The Imperialist, by Sara Jeannette Duncan
  • Straightforward, honest stories, without cant, without moralizing, full of genuine fun and hard common sense, they are just the tales that are needed to make a young fellow fall in love with simple integrity and fair dealing. Cited from Stand By The Union, by Oliver Optic
  • Whatever the popular judgment, he knew there was a work to be done and that he had power to do it; and this was his personal ambition -- to do that work in the world, and to do it without cant and humbug and self-seeking. Cited from Thomas Henry Huxley, by Leonard Huxley
  • Serious without affectation, and pious without cant, he daily became more attached to the profession he had chosen, hoping to find through it a medium by which he could one day restore to the world the talents which for half a century his father had buried in the dust. Cited from Mark Hurdlestone, by Susanna Moodie
  • It seems no one else will undertake it, so I will; and without cant or hypocrisy, which I hate, I assure you I dare not refuse the request you have so earnestly pressed. Cited from Ten Englishmen of the Nineteenth Century,by J. Joy
  • I do not expect to see religion without cant, wealth without want, and virtue without vice; but I do hope to see the human race devote itself to grander aims than following the fashions and camping on the trail of the cart- wheel dollar. Cited from Brann The Iconoclast, William Cowper Brann
  • Religious without cant, and clever without pretence, it is no wonder that his father, who was his sole instructor, reposed in the fine lad the utmost confidence, treating him more like an equal than a son, over whom he held the authority of both pastor and parent. Cited from George Leatrim, by Susanna Moodie
  • He raced honestly and bet openly, without cant and without hypocrisy; just as a financier might have traded in stocks in Wall Street; or a farmer might plant his crops and trust to the future and fair weather to yield him a harvest in return. Cited from Thoroughbreds, by W. A. Fraser
  • England, however can do her duty to Africa without cant, and humbug, and nonsense about the 'sin and crime of slavery.' Serfdom, like cannibalism and polygamy, are the steps by which human society rose to its present status: to abuse them is ignorantly to kick down the ladder. Cited from To The Gold Coast for Gold, Vol. II, by Burton and Cameron