William Oughtred

19 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It is assumed that the table was written by William Oughtred.
  • It was likely invented by William Oughtred around 1600 and became common throughout Europe.
  • William Oughtred greatly improved this in 1630 with his circular slide rule.
  • William Oughtred enhanced it to create the slide rule -- a pair of logarithmic scales movable with respect to each other.
  • Greatorex is mentioned in John Aubrey's Brief Lives as a great friend of William Oughtred the mathematician.
  • In the 1640s, he took instruction in mathematics from William Oughtred, and stayed with relations of Samuel Ward.
  • He made instruments for James I and Charles I, among others, and was associated with the mathematicians Edmund Gunter and William Oughtred.
  • Wood translated the greater part of William Oughtred's Clavis Mathematica into English; he had been one of Oughtred's pupils.
  • The Reverend William Oughtred and others developed the slide rule in the 17th century based on the emerging work on logarithms by John Napier.
  • He was finally able to indulge his mathematical interests, mastering William Oughtred's Clavis Mathematicae in a few weeks in 1647.
  • However, earlier in 1647, William Oughtred had used \delta/\pi (delta/pi) for the ratio of the diameter to perimeter.
  • William Oughtred, a contemporary of Harriot, published an algebra, Clavis mathematicae, simultaneously with Harriot's treatise. Cited from The Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia Volume 1 of 28
  • It was William Oughtred (1575-1660) who first used two such scales sliding by one another to perform direct multiplication and division, and thus is credited as the inventor of the slide rule in 1622.
  • In 1630, William Oughtred of Cambridge invented a circular slide rule, and in 1632 he combined two Gunter rules, held together with the hands, to make a device that is recognizably the modern slide rule.
  • After Napier, Edmund Gunter created the logarithmic scales (lines, or rules) upon which slide rules are based, it was William Oughtred who used two such scales sliding by one another to perform direct multiplication and division; and he is credited as the inventor of the slide rule in 1622.
  • At the suggestion of Obadiah Walker and Abraham Woodhead, he studied mathematics, a student of William Oughtred at Albury, Surrey for nine months from 1636, finding it more stimulating than the teaching of his tutor John Elmherst.
  • Using the principles of Edmund Gunter's (1581-1626) logarithmic scales and William Oughtred's (1574-1660) sliding rule, Routledge combined a 12-inch brass slide containing the logarithmic scales with an ordinary 2-foot ruler to which he added a table of commonly used references called gauge points.
  • In mathematics, three major works were published in a single year, 1631 -- the Artis analyticae praxis of Thomas Harriot (1560-1621), published ten years posthumously, and the Clavis mathematicae of William Oughtred (1575-1660).
  • William Oughtred, in the epistle to his Clavis Mathematicae (London, 1648), speaks of Wharton's proficiency; and Izaak Walton, in his Compleat Angler, expresses indebtedness to Wharton, and calls him a friend.