white pine blister

40 examples (0.03 sec)
  • In North America, there is a need for this fruit to have resistance to white pine blister rust.
  • Another is white pine blister rust which requires two alternating hosts, the blackcurrant and certain coniferous trees.
  • Foresters proposed that if all the alternate host plants were removed that White Pine Blister Rust might be eliminated.
  • An introduced fungal disease known as white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) is believed to affect some individuals.
  • White pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) needs two alternate hosts to complete its lifecycle.
  • The Rocky Mountain population is severely threatened by an introduced fungal disease known as white pine blister rust, and by pine beetles.
  • As an alternative, new strains of commercial currants have been developed which are highly resistant to White Pine Blister Rust.
  • For example, the repeating stage in white pine blister rust disease does not occur on white pines but on the alternate host, Ribes spp.
  • According to the Southwest Oregon Forest Insect and Disease Service Center, white pine blister rust attacks all five needle pines.
  • There are restrictions on growing some Ribes species in some U.S. states, as they are a host for White Pine Blister Rust.
  • Cronartium ribicola is a species of rust fungus in the family Cronartiaceae that causes the disease white pine blister rust.
  • This plant is an alternate host for the white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), the vector of a pine tree disease.
  • In particular the plant is resistant to American gooseberry mildew, blackcurrant leaf spot, white pine blister rust, and big bud gall mite.
  • Like other European and Asian white pines, Swiss pine is very resistant to white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola).
  • As of 2007, the whitebark pine is threatened by a fungus known as white pine blister rust; however, this is mostly confined to forests well to the north and west.
  • White pine blister rust, wheatstem rust, and coffee rust are examples of notoriously damaging, economically important rusts.
  • Like other European and Asian white pines, Macedonian pine is very resistant to white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola).
  • Like other European and Asian white pines, Siberian pine is very resistant to white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola).
  • In the case of the whitebark pine, an invasive species of fungus known as white pine blister rust weakens the tree, making it more susceptible to destruction from endemic mountain pine beetles.
  • Prof. F. L. Washburn was to tell us something about the white pine blister rust, but he failed to inflict upon us a long technical talk, and from what he said all the reporter got was this, from which however one could well judge what was in his thought. Cited from Trees, Fruits and Flowers of Minnesota, 1916, ed. by A. W. Latham
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