whisper of the wind

23 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It was so slight that it was hard to tell it from the whisper of the wind. Cited from The Lords of the Wild, by Joseph A. Altsheler
  • Helen heard in the whisper of the wind through the pine the old-earth story, beautiful, ever new, and yet eternal. Cited from The Man of the Forest, by Zane Grey
  • Before I could think or question, and almost as though a whisper of the wind went past, there rose in me at once this answering recognition. Cited from The Garden of Survival, by Algernon Blackwood
  • And what made me first aware of it was the whisper of the wind behind me, so that I turned with a sudden start, feeling that something had moved closer. Cited from The Damned, by Algernon Blackwood
  • This seemed the whisper of the wind in its monotone. Cited from The Law of the Land, by Emerson Hough
  • As yet she had not lived long enough in the desert to love it as she loved the wooded hills, where to her each tree was a companion and each whisper of the wind a song. Cited from Jim Waring of Sonora-Town, by Henry Herbert Knibbs
  • Could you keep her Indungeon'd from one whisper of the wind, Dark even from a side glance of the moon, And oublietted in the centre -- No! Cited from Becket and other plays,by Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • The softness of the opening of the door and the whisper of the wind, as it rushed into the hall beyond, were like a hiss of threatening secrecy. Cited from Ronicky Doone, by Max Brand
  • A distant bell called to evening prayer-meeting; the restless murmur of the river and the whisper of the wind in the pines broke the twilight stillness. Cited from A Village Stradivarius, by Kate Douglas Wiggin
  • A silence, broken only by the whisper of the wind through the rigging, reigned over all, so that men listened with anticipations of relief for the sound of answering bells. Cited from Roden's Corner, by Henry Seton Merriman
  • A distant bell, called to evening prayer-meeting; the restless murmur of the river and the whisper of the wind in the pines broke the twilight stillness. Cited from The Village Watch-Tower, by Kate Douglas Wiggin #3
  • At length, well satisfied with the distance he had come since dawn, he cleared a space among the pine cones, then lay down, and, lulled by the ancient whisper of the wind in the treetops, closed his eyes. Cited from Stories from Everybody's Magazine, 1910
  • In the whisper of the wind and the dead stillness of the thickening gloom there was the sullen brewing of storm. Cited from Baree, Son of Kazan, James Oliver Curwood
  • He strained his ears for sounds of the living world -- the spit of the fire, the fall of clinkers in the grate, the whisper of the wind stirring at the door. Cited from O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1921, by Various
  • Faintly she heard the whisper of the sea about the islet, but she would not let it hinder her imagination: she translated it by means of her imagination into the whisper of the wind low down there, in the ravine among the trees. Cited from A Spirit in Prison, by Robert Hichens
  • There was no sound, except the growing whisper of the wind, the call of a night bird, and the howl of the old gray wolf that always cried out to the moon from the tangled depths of Indian Tom's swamp. Cited from The Country Beyond, by James Oliver Curwood
  • He could hear the rush of the water through the sedge in the mill-race, and then, all at once, the roll of the wheel, the low rumble of the mill-gear, and the cool whisper of the wind in the willows. Cited from Master Skylark, by John Bennett
  • He scarcely uttered a word; when he did, it was in tones so low that they were lost in the whisper of the wind, amid the great trailing vines depending from the trees, and I was compelled to lean my ear close to catch the words. Cited from Mohun, or, The Last Days of Lee, John Esten Cooke
  • When he woke they were all in the dim forest and the Princess Yolande and Lord Mountfalcon were talking in low tones like the whisper of the wind through flowers; and it seemed as if their talk were all of love and dreams and far-away griefs and tears that must fall. Cited from The Faery Tales of Weir, by Anna McClure Sholl
  • I was a fool -- so I was told with many a languid sneer and stale jest -- to talk of hidden mysteries in the whisper of the wind and the dash of the waves -- such sounds were but common cause and effect. Cited from Ardath, by Marie Corelli
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