which the English people

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It was resolved, therefore, to attempt an invasion of England; to the threat of which the English people were always extremely sensitive. Cited from Types of Naval Officers, by A. T. Mahan (AKA: Alfred Thayer Mahan)
  • These last two clauses contained the germ of great legal principles on which the English people relied for protection against despotic kings. Cited from Early European History, By Hutton Webster
  • These are some of the innumerable frauds by which the English people have been cheated out of the trial by jury. Cited from Essay on the Trial By Jury, by Lysander Spooner
  • The educational struggle in which the English people are now engaged has made distinct and tangible certain opinions and impressions that are latent in many minds. Cited from Thoughts on Educational Topics and Institutions, by George S. Boutwell
  • Locke is a thorough Englishman, and the principle underlying his education is the principle according to which the English people have developed. Cited from The History Of Education, By Ellwood P. Cubberley
  • I am, too, disposed to deny entirely that there can be any treaty for which adequate reasons cannot be given to the English people, which the English people ought to make. Cited from The English Constitution, by Walter Bagehot
  • To what are we to attribute the unparalleled moderation and humanity which the English people had displayed at this great conjuncture? Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V2 of 4
  • These pieces were in every respect excellently mounted and played, and I gained a very good notion there of the imaginative fare in which the English people can find amusement. Cited from My Life, Volume II, by Richard Wagner
  • The extreme antipathy and dread with which the English people regarded his religion was not to be ascribed solely or chiefly to theological animosity. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 2, Macaulay
  • So she thanked Mynheer van Vandervelt, and went off to her pantry to drink some cold tea which the English people had left, and to clean the lamps. Cited from Ships That Pass In The Night, by Beatrice Harraden
  • Why could he not have given his hand to some foreign princess, and so have atoned to his subjects for breaking up the Spanish alliance, in the continuance of which the English people had no common political interest, and an extraordinary commercial interest? Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, Jul, 1862
  • The people of England had chosen their king, and a large part of the world had been won over by the arts of a foreign prince to believe that it was a righteous and holy work to set him on the throne to which the English people had chosen the foremost man among themselves. Cited from William the Conqueror, by E.A. Freeman
  • These were questions, too, with which the English people found themselves confronted in the beginning of the sixteenth century, and before that century had passed away, the results even of a very imperfect solution regarding them were apparent in every department and in every class of life. Cited from A History of English Prose Fiction, by Bayard Tuckerman
  • Did ever the most stupid country justice put a boy in the stocks without requiring stronger evidence than that on which the English people had pronounced their King guilty of the basest and most odious of all frauds? Cited from History of England, James II V. 3, Macaulay
  • Wonderful and deeply moving are his descriptions of the way in which the English people of all classes and of all political creeds and temperaments withstood the shock of the declaration of war and of its first dreadful impact. Cited from The Adventure of Living, by John St. Loe Strachey
  • But the High and Low Germans retain to the present day their distinctive language and features; and the latter branch, to which the English people belong, still lives for the most part in the same lands which it has held ever since the date of the early Germanic immigration. Cited from Early Britain, by Grant Allen
  • The French people are commonly credited with a love of ornament and display to which the English people are assumed to be strangers, but their treatment of Moliere is convincing proof that their artistic sense is ultimately truer than our own. Cited from Shakespeare and the Modern Stage, by Sir Sidney Lee
  • The ignorance of all that concerned the colonies in the early years of Victoria's reign was extraordinary, and this accounted, to a great extent, for the indifference with which the English people regarded the prospect of drifting apart. Cited from Queen Victoria, by E. Gordon Browne
  • In his quarrel with Rome he could have achieved but little, had he not happened to strike a chord of feeling to which the English people, trained by this slow and subtle work of the Lollards, responded quickly and with a vehemence upon which he had not reckoned. Cited from The Beginnings of New England, by John Fiske
  • The works of even German authors like Schiller, Heine, and Karl Marx would be forbidden, and a pamphlet written by a German and founded on official evidence to prove the injustice and tortures to which the English people were exposed under the German system of police would be destroyed. Cited from Essays in Rebellion, by Henry W. Nevinson