very presumptuous

32 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Really the store boy was getting very presumptuous he thought. Cited from The Store Boy, by Horatio Alger, Jr.
  • There is something very presumptuous about pretending to know anyone who does not quite know himself. Cited from Musicians of To-Day, by Romain Rolland
  • You think it is very presumptuous in me ever to have thought of it; but I did not think of it. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 75, January, 1864, by Various
  • "If you tell all the wild things I say to you, her ladyship will think me very presumptuous." Cited from A Terrible Temptation, by Charles Reade
  • It was thought very presumptuous for women not learned in languages and ecclesiastical history to undertake such work. Cited from Eighty Years And More; Reminiscences 1815-1897, Elizabeth Cady Stanton
  • He was very presumptuous to make such a boast. Cited from Four Arthurian Romances, by Chretien DeTroyes
  • It would seem, indeed, very presumptuous for us to assume that the great sun has come into existence solely for the benefit of poor humanity. Cited from McClure's Magazine, V. 1, No. 549, December 1895, Ed. by Ida M. Tarbell
  • She thought it very presumptuous in Hellgum to think this illness had come upon her simply to give him an opportunity to perform a miracle. Cited from Jerusalem, by Selma Lagerlo"f
  • Nevertheless, if anything occurs to me during the next two months, I will write freely, believing that you will forgive me and not think me very presumptuous. Cited from More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume I
  • "It was very presumptuous in a factory boy like you offering your escort to a young lady like Miss Paine." Cited from Brave and Bold, by Horatio Alger, Jr.
  • There is the whole story, gentlemen, very sad and, as you think, very presumptuous and wicked, but certainly not criminal or in any way connected with me. Cited from The Innocence of Father Brown by G.K.Chesterton #2
  • Nor was there anything seemingly very presumptuous in that anticipation. Cited from The Abolitionists, by John F. Hume
  • So of course it was very presumptuous in Harry to aspire to the hand of Miss Cathcart. Cited from Adela Cathcart, Vol. 3, by George MacDonald
  • It is very presumptuous to attempt to add to it, yet I have been struck with the fact that life admits of a natural analysis into no less than fifteen distinct periods. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 7, May, 1858, by Various
  • Besides a general interest about the southern lands, I have been now ever since my return engaged in a very presumptuous work, and I know no one individual who would not say a very foolish one. Cited from More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume I
  • It was what might well be written by one who imagined his affection had once been returned, but would as certainly have been deemed very presumptuous by a lady who thought that the affection itself was a liberty. Cited from The Disowned, by E. B. Lytton, Vol. 5
  • It was not so very presumptuous in me (was it?) to hope -- When all his relations -- When he himself -- Yet what room for hope did he, could he, give me? Cited from The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Volume 4 (of 7), Samuel Richardson
  • It would doubtless be exceedingly rash, and certainly very presumptuous, to seek to predict the future which may be reserved for physics. Cited from The New Physics and Its Evolution, by Lucien Poincare
  • Having met her, he realized that if he should dare to connect her in his thoughts with anything that his grandfather might be scheming he was making of himself a very presumptuous and silly ass. Cited from The Ramrodders, by Holman Day
  • It would be very presumptuous to attempt to tell any man how to acquire the highest position in his community, especially as the answer is written in his heart, his intellect, his altruistic sympathy, and his ardent civic pride. Cited from Etiquette, by Emily Post
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