very perishable

23 examples (0.01 sec)
  • These institutions are important to the farmer in that they use much fruit not otherwise valuable and very perishable. Cited from Scientific American Sup. No. 360, by Various
  • Our old-fashioned fences were sometimes very expensive, sometimes very perishable, sometimes both. Cited from The Amateur Garden, by George W. Cable
  • It is of course sold in quantities, but it is very perishable. Cited from The Story of Porcelain, by Sara Ware Bassett
  • Because guavas are very perishable, they cannot be shipped to northern markets, but various products are made from them and sent to every market. Cited from Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
  • This fruit, which is gaining in popularity in the Northern States, is very perishable and does not stand shipment well. Cited from Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
  • He was popular on the stage; some of his plays were circulated separately in cheap and very perishable quartos. Cited from Shakespeare, Bacon and the Great Unknown,Lang
  • It consists in those things which nature produces only in certain quantities, and which being of a very perishable nature, it is impossible to accumulate together the produce of many different seasons. Cited from Wealth of Nations, by Adam Smith
  • Those types of produce I classify as very perishable probably do have a half-life of from 36 to 48 hours. Cited from How and When to Be Your Own Doctor,Moser & Solomon
  • But there was no towel, so I used my handkerchief instead of my petticoat, which is made of chiffon and is very perishable. Cited from The Atlantic Book of Modern Plays, by Various
  • The first huts that were erected here were composed of very perishable materials, the soft wood of the cabbage palm, being only designed to afford immediate shelter. Cited from The Voyage Of Governor Phillip To Botany Bay, by Arthur Phillip
  • These old account-books and minute-books of the churchwardens in town and country are a very large but a very perishable and rapidly perishing treasury of information on matters the very remembrance of which is passing away. Cited from Vanishing England, by P. H. Ditchfield
  • Cream cheese of skim milk, very perishable spread. Cited from The Complete Book of Cheese, by Robert Carlton Brown
  • Whip-handles are a very perishable commodity; if one used nothing but the lash, they would be everlasting, but, as a rule, one is not long satisfied with that. Cited from The South Pole, Vols 1 and 2, Roald Amundsen
  • Khat is an important cash crop of this woreda, but because it is a very perishable commodity and must be cultivated not too far from major markets or good roads, it is grown along the main road.
  • Khat is an important cash crop of this woreda, but because it is a very perishable commodity and must be cultivated not too far from major markets or good roads, it is grown along the main roads.
  • Well, yes, you are a fairly handsome man; but that is only a very perishable advantage, and you have too much respect for conventionalities to wish to make that equal to the decree of Louis XIV. Cited from Parisian Points of View, by Ludovic Hale'vy
  • This papyrus paper was of a very perishable nature, and manuscripts written on it, apart from the wear and tear of continual use, would succumb to the process of decay in a comparatively short period. Cited from Roman Mosaics, by Hugh Macmillan
  • As animal life commenced in the ocean, so in all probability did vegetable life, though no certain traces of it are found in the earliest rocks; but this is easily accounted for by the very perishable character of the simpler forms of algae. Cited from The Story of Creation, T. S. Ackland
  • Decay seems to have gone on gradually, and in 1817 the east end is reported to be very perishable, having decayed to the depth of 3 or 4 inches from its former surface.
  • The vast majority of Ice Age art will not have survived; apart from work in wood, leather and other very perishable materials, the antler and bone which are very commonly used would normally decay if not buried in dry caves and shelters.
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