underlying bedrock

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  • In fact, however, it has been proven to be founded directly on the underlying bedrock.
  • Bedrock rivers form when the river downcuts through the modern sediments and into the underlying bedrock.
  • The change in plant associations occur because the underlying bedrock changes from shale to sandstone.
  • However, due to the toughness of the underlying bedrock, progress was costly and slow, and ceased about a year later.
  • Dendritic patterns form in homogenous landforms where the underlying bedrock has no structural control over where the water flows.
  • Tree roots bind soil together, and if the soil is sufficiently shallow they act to keep the soil in place by also binding with underlying bedrock.
  • Generally, deep pilings or foundations must be driven into solid soil (typically hard mud or sand) or to underlying bedrock.
  • Glaciers types can be grouped into two main categories, based on whether ice flow is constrained by the underlying bedrock topography.
  • Trellis patterns form in where the underlying bedrock where there is repeating weaker and stronger types of rock.
  • The springs form on converging topography where sudden topographic change always the water to escape the impermeable underlying bedrock.
  • The mantle material obscures the underlying bedrock except in areas with steep slopes, such as along the caldera's upper walls.
  • Outcrops are very scarce as the thick cover of glacial till in this area largely obscures the underlying bedrock.
  • In addition, Quaternary period gravel deeply covers the underlying bedrock in two areas in the northeast and southwest borders of the district.
  • The underlying bedrock of the valley is chalk which was laid down in the Cretaceous geological period.
  • No underlying bedrock was exposed in the crater or the numerous craterlets in Bonneville's walls.
  • Generally, deep pilings must be driven into stable soil (typically hard mud or sand) or to underlying bedrock or the slope must be stabilized.
  • The thick mantle of dust obscures the underlying bedrock, probably making in situ rock samples hard to come by and thus reducing the site's scientific value.
  • A mantle of fine dust covers much of the terrain, obscuring the underlying bedrock (rock samples might be hard to come by).
  • At the other extreme, slab-shaped slips on hillsides can remove a layer of soil from the top of the underlying bedrock.
  • The underlying bedrock of the Forest of Birse is granite, from which most of the soil in the area is derived.
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