undefined way

21 examples (0.04 sec)
  • He was also, in some undefined way, expecting that at any moment his father would change. Cited from Fortitude, by Hugh Walpole
  • And now that they were meeting again as of old, she was very conscious, in some undefined way, that she had lost ground with him. Cited from Helena, by Mrs. Humprey Ward
  • Even some aboard were very nervous, in an undefined way. Cited from The Loss of the SS. Titanic, by Lawrence Beesley
  • Amy looked at him with a strange penetrating glance that in some undefined way increased his irritation. Cited from The Captives, by Hugh Walpole
  • In some curious undefined way he resented his grandfather's remarks. Cited from Fortitude, by Hugh Walpole
  • In an undefined way, the growing girl realized that such a state of mind and heart was unworthy her sacred friendship with Miss Margaret. Cited from Tillie: A Mennonite Maid,Helen Reimensnyder Martin
  • She knew better; she regarded, in some undefined way, this continued contemplation by him of her possessions as an ironical insult. Cited from Jeremy, by Hugh Walpole
  • She thought in an almost undefined way of mother's words as she held the fluttering thrushes to her lips and kissed their downy breasts. Cited from Polly, by L. T. Meade
  • They knew, also, that their rulers were fearful about invasion, and that in some undefined way Nelson had stood, and would yet stand, between them and harm. Cited from The Life of Nelson, Vol. II. (of 2), by A. T. (Alfred Thayer) Mahan
  • It was a dress very odd and unpleasant to behold, and suggested the idea of an hospital, or a madhouse, or death, in an undefined way. Cited from Wylder's Hand, by J. Sheridan Le Fanu
  • This room, half kitchen, half parlor, again in an undefined way reminded her of the old English farmhouse where she and Maurice had been both happy and unhappy not so long ago. Cited from The Children's Pilgrimage, by L. T. Meade
  • By the rule of St Benedict, the consent of the laity was in some undefined way required; but this seems never to have been practically enforced. Cited from The Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia Volume 1 of 28
  • She thought with confidence that all would come right in the end, and vaguely she determined that in some undefined way she would help Ethel, would yet demonstrate to this child of hers that she understood and sympathised. Cited from Leonora, by Arnold Bennett
  • Still, for the present, Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths, was also in some undefined way legitimate representative of the Old Roman Empire within the borders of Italy. Cited from The Letters of Cassiodorus, by Cassiodorus
  • It is one of those cases on which a man is condemned on the ground of his character-- it is believed that he has committed a crime in some undefined way, because he had the motive for doing it; and Bulstrode's character has enveloped me, because I took his money. Cited from Middlemarch, by George Eliot[#1]
  • In vain he once more questioned clerk and servants; in vain haunted the house of his aunt, with the dim hope that Clara might hear from her, or that in some undefined way he might learn of her whereabouts, and so accomplish his desire. Cited from What Answer?, by Anna E. Dickinson
  • Finally, I have already observed that love of virtue and hatred of vice, which tend in an undefined way to bring virtue into existence and to prevent the existence of vice, are only antecedent acts of will, such as is the will to bring about the happiness of all men and to save them from misery. Cited from Theodicy, by G. W. Leibniz
  • The only positive grievance he had against him was the success he had gained with Alice; but, in an undefined way, he felt instinctively that this man possessed every Machiavellian attribute in the calendar of dishonor. Cited from The Lever, by William Dana Orcutt
  • Not thrice in his life had Verman been within the doors of White-Folks' House, and, above all things, he felt that it was in some undefined way vital to him to get out of White-Folks' House unobserved and unknown. Cited from Penrod and Sam by Booth Tarkington
  • From beliefs like these it is an easy step to the conviction that certain men are permanently possessed by a deity, or in some other undefined way are endued with so high a degree of supernatural power as to be ranked as gods and to receive the homage of prayer and sacrifice. Cited from The Golden Bough, by James George Frazer