too presumptuous

43 examples (0.03 sec)
  • I trust it is neither too presumptuous nor too late to ask. Cited from American Eloquence, Volume I (of 4), by Various
  • I feel that I have already been too presumptuous. Cited from Sunny Memories of Foreign Lands V2, by H. Stowe
  • "You are much too presumptuous, also, as I discovered in your quarters." Cited from The Barrier, by Rex Beach
  • Or, if this seems too presumptuous a question, let us put it in the form, What is the effect of his opening the play? Cited from Shakespearean Tragedy, by A. C. Bradley
  • This would have been too presumptuous an idea. Cited from Remarkable Events Which Occurred In and Near Leipzig, Frederic Shoberl
  • So he is manifestly a fool who is too presumptuous and who threatens too much. Cited from Four Arthurian Romances, by Chretien DeTroyes
  • He had come there prepared to be sedate -- at least not over-bold again, or too presumptuous. Cited from The Furnace of Gold, by Philip Verrill Mighels
  • This decision seems too presumptuous for creatures so blind and ignorant. Cited from Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, D. Hume
  • But meanwhile he was not to be too presumptuous. Cited from Betty's Bright Idea, etc., by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • These words were far too presumptuous; for the Flemings fought with great bravery. Cited from A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times, V.3 of 6, by Guizot
  • I hope now you don't hold me too presumptuous for pluming myself on the reduction of Martinico. Cited from Letters of Horace Walpole v3, Horace Walpole
  • Indeed, a man presided over the conference, for that position seemed too presumptuous even for such stout advocates of woman's rights. Cited from History of the United States, by Charles A. Beard and Mary R. Beard
  • For they were too keen, and too presumptuous, and fought too rashly, and too far advanced, and spread too widely over the broad conflict. Cited from Brut, by Layamon
  • I suppose he cannot mean anything more than that the same measure of reputation or fame (if that be not too presumptuous a word) is due to us both. Cited from The Prose Works of William Wordsworth, by William Wordsworth
  • "I have been too presumptuous; my father is a prisoner, and Sir William Wallace is lost!" Cited from The Scottish Chiefs, by Miss Jane Porter
  • "I shouldn't like to say that, it would be too presumptuous; but it would be entirely out of the ordinary course." Cited from Sister Teresa, by George Moore
  • I trust it is neither too presumptuous nor too late to ask, Can you put the dearest interest of society at risk, without guilt and without remorse? Cited from The American Union Speaker, by John D. Philbrick
  • I trust it is neither too presumptuous nor too late to ask, Can you put the dearest interest of society at risk without guilt, and without remorse? Cited from The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10), by Various
  • The heaven unexpected came, To lives that thought their worshipping A too presumptuous psalm. Cited from Poems: Three Series, Complete, by Emily Dickinson
  • If he had been too presumptuous in thinking thus of Emmeline -- if he were indeed nothing to her, why should he inflict this anguish on himself? Cited from The Mother's Recompense, Volume II, by Grace Aguilar
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