to Herdegen

23 examples (0.03 sec)
  • And she desired that I would take them all and send them back to Herdegen at some fitting time. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v3
  • The same honor was promised to Herdegen -- honor on honor, pleasure on pleasure, bravery and display! Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v5
  • And this came to Herdegen's ears, and I could see that it uplifted his spirit and confirmed him in good purpose. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v2
  • Now and again she would turn to Herdegen with some light word and a free demeanor, yet he, it was plain, would not vouchsafe to take his seat before her with the rest. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v4
  • I told first one and then the other all that stirred within me, and when I spoke to Herdegen, the elder, I saw at once that it was nothing new to him. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v1
  • But as to Herdegen, I was compelled for the time to say nothing to him of what Ann required of him, for he lay sick of a fever. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v2
  • His landed estates he had for the most part devised to the holy Church, and the remainder in equal halves to Herdegen and to me. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v7
  • This discourse had sunk deep into Ann's soul, and had been in her mind when she spoke such brave words to Herdegen, exhorting him to higher aims. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v3
  • This Abenberger, a little fellow of no note, had found in some ancient papers a recipe for discovering treasure, and had told the secret to Herdegen and some other few. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v1
  • On a sudden it flashed through my brain that this was that very horse which my grand-uncle had given to Herdegen, and herein again, meseemed, was an omen of ill. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v5
  • I breathed more freely, put my hand on my Hans' arm, and was minded to bid him take me to Herdegen and speak out my mind, but my brother, as it fell, prevented me. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v5
  • As to Herdegen, he meanwhile had greeted Ann with great courtesy; nevertheless he had kept close to the dancing wench, and took upon himself to tie her bonds and lead her to the dungeon cell. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v2
  • At supper she nodded to me many times with much contentment; except for that I might have been buried for aught she noted, for she hearkened only to Herdegen's tales as though they were a revelation from above. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v2
  • My lord the chief magistrate likewise was there, to bear witness to Herdegen's departing; also Heinrich Trardorf, his best beloved schoolmate, who had ever been his faithful friend. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v6
  • Nay, and he seemed to like Ursula well enough as his helper; albeit he owed all her sweet care and loving glances to Herdegen, for she never bestowed them but when he chanced to look that way. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v3
  • And Kunz should be held bound to carry on the said trade in the same wise as my grand-uncle had done in his life-time, and pay out of it two-third parts of the profits to Herdegen and Ann; and that these two should wed was the dearest wish of his old age. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v7
  • "Only a few moments longer, I pray you; for by the Blessed Virgin and all the Saints I swear that I would not have come hither at so late an hour but to deliver my message to Herdegen." Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v6
  • Howbeit, here again I found comfort when I marked at supper that the sweet damsel no longer heeded my simple person, whereas she had at first gazed at me with favor, but hearkened with glowing cheeks to Herdegen's discourse. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v8
  • As to Herdegen, verily I have never understood how he could find it in his heart to peril his life for the sake of keeping his word to a vagabond hussy while, at the same time, he was breaking troth with the fairest and sweetest maid on earth. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v2
  • As to Herdegen, it was no small comfort to us to learn that my lord Cardinal Bernhardi had taken that matter in hand, and had bidden all the priests and friars in the Levant to make enquiry for tidings of him. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v6
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