to dislike

1,106 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Like the old man if you can, but give him no cause to dislike you. Cited from Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son, by George Horace Lorimer
  • On the other hand, no one has reason either to dislike or fear me. Cited from A March on London, by G. A. Henty
  • We do not quite like it, yet there is nothing particular to dislike. Cited from Interludes, by Horace Smith
  • Despite this, she seems to dislike him more than many of the other residents.
  • These two species, more especially the latter, seem to dislike the cold weather. Cited from A Bird Calendar for Northern India, by Douglas Dewar
  • And my father said nothing more; he seemed to dislike the subject. Cited from The Open Door, and the Portrait., by Margaret O. (Wilson) Oliphant
  • There is less to dislike about him than about most men. Cited from Daniel Deronda, by George Eliot
  • He grew to dislike the industry out of which money is made. Cited from My Life and Work, by Henry Ford
  • This threw him too much upon clubs, and taught him to dislike general society. Cited from Autobiography of Anthony Trollope, A. Trollope
  • She had a feeling that even if she grew to dislike him, she would still trust him. Cited from Big Timber, by Bertrand W. Sinclair
  • Yet in that brief space the two men had begun to dislike each other. Cited from Round Anvil Rock, by Nancy Huston Banks
  • We begin to dislike the character, and then we know how the Australian public felt.
  • Every one looked at the speaker, and seemed rather to dislike what they saw. Cited from Romance of California Life, by John Habberton
  • I am quite certain I ought not to dislike any of them. Cited from The Personal Life Of David Livingstone, by William Garden Blaikie
  • Who has put it into your head, child, to dislike it? Cited from The Parent's Assistant, by Maria Edgeworth
  • I think I grow to dislike him more as time goes on. Cited from The Reflections of Ambrosine, by Elinor Glyn
  • "No one will ever know how hard I try not to dislike him." Cited from Malvina of Brittany, by Jerome K. Jerome
  • Both men are now well known to dislike each other.
  • You have come to dislike the very thought of marriage -- and everything of that kind. Cited from The Odd Women, by George Gissing
  • I mean to dislike your husband, and to tell him so. Cited from Howards End, by E. M. Forster
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