to bruise

125 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Handle them like eggs, so as not to bruise them, and then they will keep better. Cited from Driven Back to Eden, by E. P. Roe
  • She made her beautiful hands stiff to bruise his face. Cited from Notre-Dame de Paris, by Victor Hugo
  • And how many such blows have I had to bruise my soul! Cited from Poor Relations, by Honore de Balzac
  • It is an ancient blindness, with an ancient wall to bruise one's head. Cited from Rolf in the Woods, by Ernest Thompson Seton
  • Yet it pleased the Lord to bruise him; he hath put him to grief. Cited from Evidence of Christianity, by William Paley
  • This time Rose did not attempt to bruise herself against the elder woman's imperturbability. Cited from The Shoulders of Atlas, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
  • I've always adored the strength in you -- even when it was rough enough to bruise me. Cited from The Danger Mark, by Robert W. Chambers
  • His frequent thrashings seemed to bruise young John's spirit as much as they did his flesh. Cited from Old John Brown, by Walter Hawkins
  • Then each began, as it were, to bruise the head o' the serpent. Cited from Darrel of the Blessed Isles, by Irving Bacheller
  • Men had only touched him to bruise him. Cited from Les Miserables, by Victor Hugo
  • But Mr. Johnson is ready to bruise any one who calls in question your classical knowledge and your happy application of it. Cited from Notes and Queries, Number 179, April 2, 1853, ed. by George Bell
  • You see, I did not wish to bruise her ego with brutal facts. Cited from The Cruise of the Snark, Jack London
  • It is difficult, though not impossible, to bruise them, break their bones or strain their joints.
  • Do not strike it so hard as to bruise the check, but simply tap it. Cited from Rough and Tumble Engineering, by James H. Maggard
  • While the edges are chamfered it is still possible to bruise perhaps even cut if the device is landed on edge.
  • Be careful not to bruise the bark in any of these operations. Cited from Hunting with the Bow and Arrow, by Saxton Pope
  • We accordingly drew him up instantly, but so incautiously as to bruise him badly against the ladder. Cited from The Works of Edgar Allan Poe V3[Raven Edition]
  • It is no longer woman who is to bruise the serpent's head, but the seed of the woman, or the son. Cited from God-Idea of the Ancients, by Eliza Burt Gamble
  • He is the woman's seed, who, so God promised, was to bruise the head of the serpent. Cited from The Good News of God, by Charles Kingsley
  • Authority without wisdome is like a heavy axe without an edge, fitter to bruise than polish. Cited from Anne Bradstreet and Her Time, by Helen Campbell
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