thrice fifty

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Thrice fifty warriors went out to meet them. Cited from The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Ta'in Bo' Cu'alnge, by Unknown
  • They cast their thrice fifty hurl-bats at the poll of the boy's head. Cited from The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Ta'in Bo' Cu'alnge, by Unknown
  • Speckled-green drawers they wore, and in their hands were thrice fifty great clubs of thorn with bands of iron. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • At the sound of the spark the thrice fifty boats were hurled out, so that they were on the shoulders of the sea. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • When it was at wrestling they were, he would throw those same thrice fifty boys to the ground under him, and they did not succeed all of them around him in lifting him up. Cited from The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Ta'in Bo' Cu'alnge, by Unknown
  • He shews him his shield-arm, whereon were thrice fifty wounds: this is what was inflicted upon it. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • Thrice fifty youths accompany him with their play-clubs, and that was a third of the boy-troop of Ulster. Cited from The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Ta'in Bo' Cu'alnge, by Unknown
  • Of this host, then, there was a multitude, both on this side and on that, namely, thrice fifty boats, with five thousand in them, and ten hundred in every thousand. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • It is one of thrice fifty islands to the west of Erin, and there she dwells with thousands of "motley women." Cited from The Religion of the Ancient Celts, by J. A. MacCulloch
  • Thrice fifty youths were with Folloman, Conchobar's son, at their games on the fair-green of Emain. Cited from The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Ta'in Bo' Cu'alnge, by Unknown
  • Of men thrice fifty fifties Would win the Ailbe Hound; In pride of war they struggled, Small cause for strife they found. Cited from Heroic Romances of Ireland (complete)Leahy
  • Now Conall Cernach escaped from the Hostel, and thrice fifty spears had gone through the arm which upheld his shield. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • In one house dwells white Failbe, With Labra, his friend; And retainers thrice fifty Each monarch attend. Cited from Heroic Romances of Ireland vol 1, AH Leahy
  • The swineherd shouted, and the people of the two Maines came to him, and the thrice fifty men were arrested, along with their auxiliaries, and taken to Tara. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • Thereafter Da Derga came to them, with thrice fifty warriors, each of them having a long head of hair to the hollow of his polls, and a short cloak to their buttocks. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • Thence they put to sea and met the son of the king of Britain, even Ingcel the One-eyed, grandson of Conmac: thrice fifty men and their veterans they met upon the sea. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • I beheld thrice fifty boys on silvern chairs around him, and there were fifteen bulrushes in the hand of that red-freckled boy, with a thorn at the end of each of the rushes. Cited from The Harvard Classics, Vol. 49, Epic and Saga, Ed. by Charles W. Eliot
  • In the place where the bull saw Lothar, the cowherd, he attacked him, and soon he carried his entrails out on his horns and together with his thrice fifty heifers he attacked the camp, so that fifty warriors perished. Cited from The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Ta'in Bo' Cu'alnge, by Unknown
  • When it was at hole-play they were -- a game of hole that used to be played on the fair-green of Emain -- and it was their turn to drive and his to keep guard, he would catch the thrice fifty balls just outside of the hole, and not one went by him into the hole. Cited from The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Ta'in Bo' Cu'alnge, by Unknown
  • So, when I'm passing Charing Cross, Where porters work both night and day, I ofttimes hear sweet Malpas Brook, That flows thrice fifty miles away. Cited from Georgian Poetry 1913-15, by Edited by E. H. Marsh
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