thrice blest

19 examples (0.01 sec)
  • Thrice blest Who from the gifts by him possessed Such benefit can draw! Cited from The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. I.
  • Thrice blest the man, who, in her sacred shrine, Feels himself shelter'd from the wrath divine! Cited from Religious and Moral Poems, by Phillis Wheatley
  • Blest the mouth through which thou glidest, And the lips thrice blest by thee! Cited from Wine, Women, and Song, by Various
  • Thrice blest is he to whom is given The instinct that can tell That God is on the field when he Is most invisible. Cited from The World's Best Poetry Volume IV., by Bliss Carman
  • And thrice blest was Browning, in that Fate allowed him to live his philosophy -- to work his poetry up into life, and then again to transmute life and love into art. Cited from Little Journeys To The Homes Of English Authors, by Elbert Hubbard
  • He sat by her side and her soft hand he pressed; He felt in the pressure returned him thrice blest, Enraptured gazing On her whom he honored beyond all praising. Cited from Fridthjof's Saga, by Esaias Tegne'r
  • Then let us, brother, with our might, Work for Him while 'tis called To-day; Looking above for strength, for light, Press forward in this thrice-blest way. Cited from The Emigrant Mechanic and Other Verse, by Cowherd
  • Thrice blest will all our blessings be, When we can look through them to Thee; When each glad heart its tribute pays Of love and gratitude and praise. Cited from Daily Strength for Daily Needs,by Mary W. Tileston
  • Such homes of cheerful industry, Of order, thrift and care, Sweetly reflect on those whose minds, Their thrice blest precincts share. Cited from Home Lyrics, by Hannah S. Battersby
  • Thrice blest whose lives are faithful prayers, Whose loves in higher love endure; What souls possess themselves so pure, Or is there blessedness like theirs? Cited from England's Antiphon, by George MacDonald
  • She is sung, and New Zealand shall take her, Thrice blest to possess such a matron, And give thanks to its first ballad-maker, Who found it a saint for a patron. Cited from Station Life in New Zealand, by Lady Barker
  • Thrice blest and happy Tappan Zee, Whose banks along thy glistening tide Have legend, truth, and poetry Sweetly expressed in Sunnyside! Cited from The Hudson, by Wallace Bruce
  • That open brow, that courteous grace, Bespeaks thee of thy generous race; Thy father's soul is in thy smile-- Thrice blest his name in Erin's isle. Cited from Tales And Novels, Vol. 8, by Maria Edgeworth
  • Thrice blest was I what time thy piercing dart I could withstand and conquer in days past: But now my breast with grief is overcast; Against my will I weep, and suffer smart. Cited from Sonnets, by Michael Angelo Buonarroti & Tommaso Campanella
  • Oh lowly cots of Cymru, blest, yea, thrice blest are ye! Cited from Welsh Lyrics of the Nineteenth Century, by Edmund O. Jones
  • Perchance the time shall be When to my place of rest, With milder grace my wild fawn shall return Here where she looked on me Upon that day thrice blest: Then she shall bend her radiant eyes that yearn In search of me, and (piteous sight!) shall learn That I, amidst the stones, am clay. Cited from The Poems of Emma Lazarus, Volume II
  • Oh, blest be the tear, and in memory oft May its sparkle be shed o'er the wanderer's dream; Thrice blest be that eye, and may passion as soft, As free from a pang, ever mellow its beam! Cited from The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore,by T. Moore
  • When nightingales their woodland nests have left, The autumn sky of gray, white-capped, cloud-reft, Prepares the shroud which Winter soon shall spread On frozen fields; there comes a day thrice blest, When earth forgetting, all our musings rest On those who are no more the dreamless dead. Cited from Purgatory, by Mary Anne Madden Sadlier
  • That 'Eisteddfodau' Welshman teach To spurn the thrice blest English speech: Welsh books -- there are none, save what quacks Sell the poor churls as almanacks. Cited from Welsh Lyrics of the Nineteenth Century, by Edmund O. Jones