thrice as long

19 examples (0.02 sec)
  • It is perhaps one hundred yards wide and thrice as long. Cited from West Wind Drift, by George Barr McCutcheon
  • With respect to the pistil, the style may be almost thrice as long in the one form as in the other. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • He held her hand -- and would have held it thrice as long -- and looked into her eyes, too overcome, it appeared, to speak. Cited from Sisters, by Ada Cambridge
  • Had the stair been thrice as long, Hagen had not left him time for a single thrust. Cited from The Fall of the Niebelungs
  • The filaments may differ in colour and thickness, and are sometimes nearly thrice as long in the one form as in the other. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • Cleopatra had kept him waiting two hours, but he would willingly have loitered in the anteroom thrice as long if she only determined to follow his counsel. Cited from Cleopatra, by Georg Ebers, v7
  • After the space of about three-quarters of an hour, which the uncertainty and danger of their situation made seem almost thrice as long, the voice of young Hazlewood was heard without. Cited from Guy Mannering, by Walter Scott
  • The pistil of the long-styled form is about thrice as long as that of the short- styled, the stigma being double as long and covered with much longer papillae. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • You can satisfy your hunger in such a berry-patch in ten minutes, while out in the field you must pick for half an hour, and in the forest thrice as long, before you can fill a small tin cup. Cited from Fisherman's Luck, by Henry van Dyke
  • The upper surface is covered with tentacles arranged in alternate rows; those in the middle being short and crowded together, those towards the margins longer, even twice or thrice as long as the blade is broad. Cited from Insectivorous Plants, by Charles Darwin
  • This form can be at once recognised by the length of the pistil, which is (including the ovarium) fully one-third longer than that of the mid-styled, and more than thrice as long as that of the short-styled form. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • In one Carrier the orifice of the nostrils was thrice as long as in the rock- pigeon, though in body and length of beak this bird was not nearly double the size of the rock-pigeon. Cited from Animals and Plants under Domestication V 1, Darwin
  • The pistil of the long-styled flowers projects just beyond the mouth of the corolla, and is thrice as long as that of the short-styled, and the divergent stigmas are likewise rather larger. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • I am aware that two palaeontologists, whose opinions are worthy of much deference, namely Bronn and Woodward, have concluded that the average duration of each formation is twice or thrice as long as the average duration of specific forms. Cited from Origin of Species, 6th Ed., by Charles Darwin
  • The long-styled pistil is sometimes thrice as long as that of the short-styled; but from an average of ten measurements of both, its length to that of the short-styled was as 100 to 56. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • Although somewhat variable in shape, one difference is persistent, namely, in roughness: in some specimens carefully compared, the papillae which render the stigma rough were in the long- styled form from twice to thrice as long as in the short-styled. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • The pistil of the long-styled form is about thrice as long as that of the short- styled; the stigma of the former is globular and closely beset with papillae, whilst that of the short-styled is smooth and depressed on the apex. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • The pistil of the long-styled form is nearly thrice as long (i.e. as 14 to 5) as that of the short-styled, and is very much thinner in the ratio of about 3 to 5. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]
  • The pistil of the long-styled form is nearly thrice as long as that of the short-styled, or, speaking strictly, as 100 to 39; and the papillae on the stigma of the former are broader, in the ratio of 4 to 3, but whether longer than those of the short- styled, I could not decide. Cited from Different Forms of Flowers, by Charles Darwin #19]