thrice accursed

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Accursed as war always is, it is thrice accursed when young boys and old men are called upon to fight. Cited from With Methuen's Column on an Ambulance Train, by Ernest N. Bennett
  • Her good looks and my illusions have passed away: but those verses -- those thrice accursed verses, remain. Cited from Twenty-One Days in India; and, the Teapot Series, by Aberigh-Mackay
  • And your viper did not choke, may she be thrice accursed, the she-devil! Cited from The Bishop and Other Stories, by Anton Chekhov
  • And my father's woe, and the desolation of that late so smiling home all was the work of my thrice-accursed hands! Cited from Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
  • Oh, I am so cheerful over this heavenly relief from thrice-accursed "modernity." Cited from Old Fogy, by James Huneker
  • I will come at once, then, to the insults to which we have been subjected by the thrice accursed Parrhesiades. Cited from Works, V1, by Lucian of Samosata
  • As you will know full well, I was not minded to give this thrice-accursed fiend more than the gentleman's chance I had promised to give him. Cited from The Master of Appleby, by Francis Lynde
  • But no bodily deformity could have corroded us as did those thrice-accursed garments with terror of the world without and of its laughter. Cited from The Adventures of Harry Revel, by Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
  • "Daughter of a thrice-accursed mother, and of a despicable race!" she cried in her odd patois, which it was often better not to understand too well. Cited from The Princess Passes, by Williamson
  • "How can a gentleman sleep for your thrice-accursed hammering?" was my answer to Felipe Fill-the-Bag. Cited from The Laird's Luck and Other Fireside Tales, by Arthur Quiller-Couch ["Q"]
  • "I would that the powers of evil, of whom you are, might strangle the thrice-accursed lie in your false throat!" she said, in low fierce tones, and turned away. Cited from Marzio's Crucifix and Zoroaster, by F. Marion Crawford
  • Blessed is love, less blessed is hatred, but thrice accursed is that indifference which is neither one nor the other, the muddy mess which men call friendship. Cited from Mark Rutherford's Deliverance,by M. Rutherford
  • Accursed be the heart which has no opening door for the immigrant's weary feet, and thrice accursed be the heart which remembers strangerhood against some mother's homeless boy. Cited from St. Cuthbert's, by Robert E. Knowles
  • "The smallest limp, at the outside!" he promised me; he would not answer entirely for the left leg, that thrice-teasing, thrice-accursed fracture. Cited from Sir John Constantine, by Prosper Paleologus Constantine
  • Till my sins and sons through sinless lands dispersed, With red flame shod, Made accurst the name of man, and thrice accursed The name of God. Cited from Songs before Sunrise, by Swinburne
  • Thrice accursed be that garrison-town, when it dives under the boat's keel, and comes up a league or two to the right, with the packet shivering and spluttering and staring about for it! Cited from The Bed-Book of Happiness, by Harold Begbie
  • Accursed was the name Of him who slew a righteous man, whose soul Was ripe for Heaven; thrice accursed he Whose art malignant sinks a soul to hell. Cited from The Canadian Elocutionist, by Anna Kelsey Howard
  • The thought of this unspoiled young maiden having aught to do with such a thrice-accursed despoiler of women made my blood boil afresh; and in the heat of it I let my secret slip, or rather some small part of it. Cited from The Master of Appleby, by Francis Lynde
  • Its instincts are noble and supreme, its obligations are no less than its privileges; it is a great light which streams backward through the darkness of the ages, and if by that light you guide not your footsteps, then are you thrice accursed, holding as you do that lamp of honour in your hands. Cited from Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida, by Ouida
  • There was a shrine in this room for private devotions, the corresponding spot in the adjoining room being a rough opium-couch already occupied by two lusty thickset "slaves to this thrice-accursed drug." Cited from An Australian in China, by George Ernest Morrison
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