thieves' cant

23 examples (0.05 sec)
  • The origin of the word is uncertain, although it appears to be connected with Thieves' cant.
  • Some words from thieves' cant continued to be used into the twentieth century combined with slang words from eighteenth century London.
  • Kuiper suggested that the differences might also be argot, such as a thieves' cant.
  • However, the word Bargoens usually refers to the thieves' cant spoken in the latter half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century.
  • In thieves' cant the word pussy means a "fur coat".
  • First attested in 1785, the word's origin is unclear, though one suggestion is that it was thieves' cant for lightning.
  • The document suggests a complete separation between Thieves' Cant, and the variant of English Romani of the time.
  • Priests of Syrul have developed a "doublespeak" language similar to thieves' cant that allows them to have secret conversations in the open while seeming to talk about something else entirely.
  • The Thieves' Cant was a feature of popular pamphlets and plays particularly between 1590 and 1615, but continued to feature in literature through the 18th century.
  • Prison slang has existed as long as there have been crime and prisons; in Charles Dickens' time it was known as "thieves' cant."
  • St Giles's Roundhouse was a jail and St Giles' Greek a thieves' cant.
  • It is a curious picture of criminal life, the best, and seemingly the most faithful, of its kind, and possesses also some linguistic value, as being mainly written in the Scottish thieves' cant, which contains a good many genuine Romany words.
  • Some slang was developed because of a need for secrecy, such as prison slang, believed to be derived from thieves cant, and Polari, a variety used by homosexuals in Britain and the United Kingdom.
  • The dialogue is a mixture of Cockney rhyming slang, London Yiddish, and thieves' cant.
  • It was a Cockney comedy and the dialogue is in the Cockney dialect with much rhyming slang and thieves' cant.
  • Examples of anti-languages include cockney rhyming slang, CB slang, the grypsera of Polish prisons, thieves' cant and possibly Bangime.
  • Lexicographers mined it for authentic usage of Cockney rhyming slang and thieves' cant.
  • The Canting Academy, or Devil's Cabinet Opened was a 17th-century slang dictionary, written in 1673 by Richard Head, that looked to define thieves' cant.
  • After 1608, Dekker produced his most popular pamphlets: a series of "cony-catching" pamphlets that described the various tricks and deceits of confidence-men and thieves, including Thieves' Cant.
  • In legend, it was where thieves' cant was created by a meeting between Cock Lorel, leader of the rogues and Giles Hather, the King of the Gypsies.
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