they astonish

17 examples (0.03 sec)
  • As it is, they astonish us only too little. Cited from The Myths of the New World, by Daniel G. Brinton
  • They astonish'd at his tone (For vehement he spake) sat silent all. Cited from The Iliad of Homer, Translated into English Blank Verse, Tr. by Cowper
  • In truth, these steps and these temple porticos are the only imposing works that this people has created, and they astonish, for they scarcely seem Japanese. Cited from Madame Chrysantheme, by Pierre Loti
  • In truth, these steps and these temple porticoes are the only imposing works that this people has created, and they astonish, for they do not seem Japanese. Cited from Madame Chrysantheme by Pierre Loti, v1
  • They bitterly resent being taken in or deceived, and when they think they have been, they astonish people by the bitterness of their resentment. Cited from Palmistry for All, by Cheiro
  • Ordinary men -- those who are more educated: philosophers, they astonish ordinary men -- Christians, they astonish philosophers. Cited from Pascal's Pensees, by Blaise Pascal
  • They astonish the pit, they gain the applause of the galleries, but when the curtain falls there is nothing left to benefit mankind. Cited from Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Volume VIII, by Robert Green Ingersoll
  • They astonish you with strokes of the most sublime oratory; such as prove their reason and sentiment strong, their imagination glowing and elevated. Cited from The Journal of Negro History, Volume 3, 1918, by Various
  • All day long they are regaled with a subjective menagerie, and when they attend the circus in the evening they astonish their parents by the extent and accuracy of their information. Cited from The Vitalized School, by Francis B. Pearson
  • They are very beautiful, and they astonish me, but I am not collected enough -- not familiar enough with myself, if you can quite understand what I mean -- to have all the pleasure in them that I might have. Cited from Little Dorrit, by Charles Dickens
  • This third stage has its May-day, when the things which have become hackneyed to our minds from long use come to them with the full force of revelations, and they astonish us by their exuberant delight. Cited from The Education of Catholic Girls, by Janet Erskine Stuart
  • The papers now before me were objects of daily and nightly study with me eighteen or nineteen years ago; but even now, though their perusal is but the last of a series of repetitions, they astonish me. Cited from Faraday As A Discoverer, by John Tyndall
  • Having belonged to five different drill-clubs before entering the army, I certainly ought to know something of the resources of human awkwardness, and I can honestly say that they astonish me by the facility with which they do things. Cited from Army Life in a Black Regiment, by T. Higginson
  • At present, I can only say they astonish me, and put me to shame: the unresting diligence displayed in them, and the immense sum-total of them,-- what man, in any the noblest pursuit, can say that he has stood to it, six-and-forty years long, in the style of this man? Cited from Carlyle's "History of Friedrich II of Prussia V 16
  • There is nothing that strikes the undemocratic doctrinaire so sharply about direct democratic action as the vanity or mummery of the things done seriously in the daylight; they astonish him by being as unpractical as a poem or a prayer. Cited from A Short History of England, by G. K. Chesterton
  • When trembling Pris'ners all stand round the Bar, A strange suspence about the fatal Verdict, And when the Jury crys they Guilty are, How they astonish'd are when they have heard it. Cited from The Fifteen Comforts of Matrimony: Responses From Women, by Various
  • He ended; they astonish'd at his tone (For vehement he spake) sat silent all, Till Phoenix, aged warrior, at the last 535 Gush'd into tears (for dread his heart o'erwhelm'd Lest the whole fleet should perish) and replied. Cited from The Iliad of Homer, Translated into English Blank Verse, Tr. by Cowper