thee for

1,283 examples (0.04 sec)
  • He will not be able to see thee for at least a week. Cited from Mistress Penwick, by Dutton Payne
  • I am here at thy feet to ask thee for my wife. Cited from Prince Eugene, by Louisa Muhlbach
  • We honor thee for all you've done to help us great and small.
  • Who shall say it was not allowed thee for him? Cited from Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ, by Lew Wallace
  • But come with me, for I need thee for a little while. Cited from The Substance of a Dream, by F. W. Bain (AKA: Francis William Bain)
  • "But my soul tells me I look on thee for the last time!" Cited from The Abbot, by Sir Walter Scott
  • Still my trust is fixed on thee For those that still remain and for myself. Cited from Poems by George Meredith - Volume 1
  • Rather, then, I think is it for me to ask thee for some such information. Cited from The Sea-Hawk, by Rafael Sabatini
  • All evil will be visited upon thee for playing the part of a holy priest. Cited from Mistress Penwick, by Dutton Payne
  • Had he lived, I should never have been given unto thee for wife. Cited from The Legends of the Jews by Louis Ginzberg Volume 4
  • Right well in heart they know thee for the King. Cited from Myths and Legends of All Nations, by Various
  • Thy relations and friends have gathered about thy body to look upon thee for the last time. Cited from Legends, Traditions, and Laws of the Iroquois, or
  • The ground will serve thee for a table, and I will tell thee what to write. Cited from In the Days of Chivalry, by Evelyn Everett-Green
  • "Would to heaven I had had thee for my man this three years since." Cited from Hereward, by Charles Kingsley
  • Let them not be separated from thee for ever (by losing their lives). Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1
  • They will take thee for one of us. Cited from Virginians, By William Makepeace Thackeray
  • And then will he, in all probability, be sure of thee for ever. Cited from Clarissa Harlowe, Volume 9 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • What, Will, we may not miss thee for no money. Cited from Old English Plays, Vol. II, by Dodsley
  • So, Nature, I return to thee, to be united with thee for ever. Cited from Moral Philosophy, by Joseph Rickaby, S. J
  • Wild little bird, who chose thee for a sign To put upon the cover of this book? Cited from Dome of Many-Coloured Glass, Amy Lowell
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