than downright

19 examples (0.04 sec)
  • "But what we have said is no more nor less than downright treason." Cited from The Circassian Slave,Lieutenant Maturin Murray
  • Slavery, as he viewed it, was nothing more nor less than downright robbery. Cited from The Underground Railroad, by William Still
  • The little less than downright open abuse, and the many really rude things which the members said to each other, struck me much. Cited from Travels in England in 1782, by Charles P. Moritz
  • The sense of duty that rises on that sort of foundation is more mischievous than downright want of principle. Cited from The Irrational Knot, by George Bernard Shaw
  • My father was a perfectly honest man, and hated shiftiness even worse than downright lying. Cited from The Early Life of Mark Rutherford, Mark Rutherford
  • "He can't appreciate her; it can be nothing more, on his part, than downright fortune-hunting." Cited from Elinor Wyllys, by Susan Fenimore Cooper
  • And the half-patronizing, half-contemptuous nods he did receive were far worse to bear than downright cuts. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 3, No. 19, May, 1859, by Various
  • This constant suspense is worse than downright defeat or certain misfortune. Cited from The Heart's Secret, by Maturin Murray
  • It was said with that provoking indifference more trying to a sensitive mind than downright insult. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 55, May, 1862, by Various
  • With more complete acquaintance there was far less tendency towards certain passages which, under ordinary conditions, could be construed as nothing else than downright flirtation. Cited from The Wings of the Morning, by Louis Tracy
  • But he wandered less than he had done from London, finding, in his remote but fragrant corner of the earth, that peace which twenty years of a strenuous manhood had taught him to value more than downright happiness. Cited from The Shadow of the Rope, by E. W. Hornung
  • Now, it is not in the least a question of whether we happen to like this quality or that: Mr. Shaw, I rather fancy, would dislike such verbose compromise more than downright plotting. Cited from The Crimes of England, by G.K. Chesterton
  • Especially severe was he upon waverers, who, he said, were worse than downright enemies, as, while the one withstood the Parliament openly in fair fight, the others were shifted to and fro with each breeze, and none could say whether they were friends or enemies. Cited from Friends, though divided, by G. A. Henty
  • The old sneer at Solon's Boss-ship was again to be observed on every hand, that attitude of doubting ridicule, half-playful, half-contemptuous, which your public man finds more dangerous to his influence than downright hostility would be. Cited from The Boss of Little Arcady, by Harry Leon Wilson
  • To-day she ate her luncheon with a forced appetite, glanced about with a listlessness far removed from her usual alert interest, and followed Jock's attempts at conversation with a polite effort that was more insulting than downright inattention. Cited from Personality Plus, by Edna Ferber
  • These fellows, like the rest on the coast, were a set of imposing rascals, little better than downright savages; Lander was informed that they had absolutely starved three white men, shortly before his arrival, who had been wrecked in a slaving vessel, when crossing the bar. Cited from Lander's Travels, by Robert Huish
  • His unmeaning grin of good-natured acquiescence in whatever I bade him do, was more provoking than downright rebellion could have been; and I secretly agreed with my friends that the attempt would prove a complete failure, while impelled, I hardly could tell how, to persevere with redoubled efforts. Cited from Personal Recollections, by Charlotte Elizabeth
  • They knew that liberty in the hands of feeble-minded and unreasoning persons (and all the worse if they are honest) means nothing more than the supremacy of their particular form of imbecility; means nothing less, therefore, than downright chaos, a Bedlam-chaos of monomaniacs and bores. Cited from Among My Books, by James Russell Lowell
  • There are some vices whose grotesqueness stirs us more deeply than downright atrocities, and we read of certain puerilities avowed by Rousseau, with a livelier impatience than old Benvenuto Cellini quickens in us, when he confesses to a horrible assassination. Cited from Rousseau, Volumes 1 and 2, by John Morley