temper would have

19 examples (0.02 sec)
  • And yet, if Lady Jane had known all, I think even her kindly temper would have failed her. Cited from Vanity Fair, by William Thackeray
  • His father's temper would have yielded a point or two, the next day, had it been given the least encouragement. Cited from Cabin Fever, by B. M. Bower
  • His temper would have preferred to buffet the angry weather. Cited from The Egoist, by George Meredith
  • Indeed, his surly temper would have brought the conference to an abrupt end but for the interference of the girl at the inn. Cited from Jan of the Windmill,Juliana Horatia Ewing
  • He was the leader of their plays and amusements, and but for the occasional outbreaks of his violent temper would have been a great favourite. Cited from Emilie the Peacemaker, by Mrs. Thomas Geldart
  • She had not dared to let him see all her despondency, for his impatient and sanguine temper would have resented it. Cited from Denzil Quarrier, George Gissing
  • From time to time undoubtedly men of commanding genius and of aspiring temper would have made their appearance among the representatives of the counties and boroughs. Cited from History of England, James II V. 4, Macaulay
  • Besides, the consciousness of warmth in my own temper would have made me inexcusable had I suffered myself to dwell on an inadvertent word from another. Cited from Samuel F. B. Morse, His Letters and Journals, by Samuel F. B. Morse
  • Gilbert Stuart, who painted several of his portraits, said that his features showed strong passions and that, had he not learned self-restraint, his temper would have been savage. Cited from Washington and his Comrades in Arms, George Wrong
  • It was frank and affectionate; consistent with her conjugal duty, but not such as a very circumspect and wary temper would have allowed itself to write. Cited from Jane Talbot, by Charles Brockden Brown
  • Vanity would have made her ridiculously ostentatious and conceited; a jealous temper would have become self-willed and domineering. Cited from Elinor Wyllys, by Susan Fenimore Cooper
  • What I suffered with that rein for four months in my lady's carriage would be hard to describe; but I am quite sure that, had it lasted much longer, either my health or my temper would have given way. Cited from Black Beauty, Young Folks' Edition, by Anna Sewell
  • He desired to shirk the combat with Chilvers, and welcomed as an excuse for doing so the shame which another temper would have stubbornly defied. Cited from Born In Exile, By George Gissing
  • Susan was only acting on the same truths, and pursuing the same system, which her own judgment acknowledged, but which her more supine and yielding temper would have shrunk from asserting. Cited from Mansfield Park, by Jane Austen
  • Such invincible and inevitable sweetness of temper would have made the most commonplace man attractive: we need not say what a charm it gave to such powers and accomplishments as those of Mr. Choate. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 11, No. 63, January, 1863, by Various
  • That he could not be open with his mother, no one that knew her unreasoning and stormy temper would have wondered; but the pitiful boy, who did not like lying, actually congratulated himself that he had got through without telling a downright falsehood. Cited from Heather and Snow, by George MacDonald
  • Nearly all men would have exhibited these traits, had they been seated on such a throne as his; and almost any man's temper would have occasionally given way under such burdens as he assumed, such hostilities as he encountered, and such treasons as he detected. Cited from Beacon Lights of History, Volume IX, by John Lord
  • A man of more vigorous temper would have been maddened at the thought; but Mr. Tymperley nursed it all day long, his emotions only expressing themselves in a little sigh or a sadly wistful smile. Cited from The House of Cobwebs and Other Stories, by George Gissing
  • A churlish temper would have submitted with extreme reluctance, and many taunting reproaches to what might easily have been represented as the drudgery and degradation of the gleaner's field; but this excellent daughter-in-law displayed a spirit most worthy of imitation. Cited from Female Scripture Biographies, Vol. I, by F. A. Cox