temper of the times

79 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The temper of the times among young educated men was working in the same direction. Cited from The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Vol. 1 (of 3), by John Morley
  • I look to the temper of the times in forming rules for conduct. Cited from Tales And Novels, Vol. 8, by Maria Edgeworth
  • One famous incident of life in Congress must be told to explain the temper of the times. Cited from Abraham Lincoln, by Lord Charnwood
  • Of course, the nature of that contribution was subject to the temper of the times.
  • Now the temper of the times saw in it nothing but a hateful change. Cited from Revolt of Netherlands, by F. Schiller, Book II
  • Charles, guessing the temper of the times, allowed the case to go to trial. Cited from Little Journeys. . .Great Reformers, by Hubbard
  • The legal method of impeachment seemed far too slow and uncertain for the temper of the times. Cited from History of Liberia, by J.H.T. McPherson
  • The temper of the times explains the case to every body that pleases but to look into it. Cited from The Complete English Tradesman (1839 ed.), by Daniel Defoe
  • We find that the discourse of men always conforms to the temper of the times. Cited from A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, by Cornelius Tacitus
  • The neurotic temper of the times is known to all. Cited from Political Thought in England from Locke to Bentham, by Harold J. Laski
  • The effect of this little book was great, nay, immense, and chiefly because it exactly hit the temper of the times. Cited from The World's Greatest Books, Vol IX, Ed. by Arthur Mee & J.A. Hammerton
  • But he had less prudence and self-restraint, and the temper of the times was now altered. Cited from Outline of Universal History,by George Park Fisher
  • He knew that the temper of the times demanded wise concessions; but he also knew how to win through these concessions the reality of power. Cited from Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2, by John Addington Symonds
  • The temper of the times was all for relentless partisanship, both in religion and in politics. Cited from The Builders, by Joseph Fort Newton
  • This his surrender to Captain Maitland -- to say nothing of the temper of the times -- put out of the question. Cited from The History of Napoleon Buonaparte, by John Gibson Lockhart
  • As toasts show the temper of the times, and bespeak the sentiments of those who give them, a few of them may be mentioned. Cited from Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes, by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
  • It seems, therefore, rather to have arisen from the peculiar temper of the times, and to the condition in which the nation was placed at this period. Cited from History of England in Three Volumes, Vol. III, by E. Farr & E. H. Nolan
  • And error, no matter how agreeable or how nicely adjusted to the temper of the times, is always error. Cited from An Introduction to Philosophy, by George Stuart Fullerton
  • To know the temper of the times with accuracy, is one of the first talents requisite to a dramatic author. Cited from John Bull, by George Colman
  • But he saw no harm in it -- not he, and should be prepared to support it when circumstances, that is to say the temper of the times, would permit him. Cited from Sybil, or the Two Nations, by Benjamin Disraeli
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