temper of

3,106 examples (0.05 sec)
  • I knew now the temper of the men we had to deal with. Cited from Slippy McGee, Sometimes Known as the Butterfly Man, Marie Conway Oemler
  • Children generally take the temper of their whole lives from this period of their existence. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 61, November, 1862, by Various
  • Oh that at length our age would raise Into the temper of those days! Cited from Less-known British Poets, Vol. 2, by Gilfillan
  • The temper of the head of the family suffered in at least equal degree. Cited from Queechy, by Elizabeth Wetherell
  • The following lines, found among her papers, will show in what temper of mind she went. Cited from The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss, by George L. Prentiss
  • If successful, the whole temper of his mind might change towards the situation, if not toward her. Cited from The Chief Legatee, by Anna Katharine Green
  • The temper of the times among young educated men was working in the same direction. Cited from The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Vol. 1 (of 3), by John Morley
  • The tone and temper of the work is unique among books of its class. Cited from The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 3, Ed. by Warner
  • It would thus become an established element in the temper of the age. Cited from On Compromise, by John Morley
  • This incident, in my then temper of mind, produced its full effect. Cited from Anna St. Ives, by Thomas Holcroft
  • Change of place did not change the temper of the house. Cited from The Life of George Washington, Vol. 1 (of 5), by John Marshall
  • The temper of the House is said to have been rather good. Cited from Political Diary 1828-1830, Volume II, by Edward Law (Lord Ellenborough)
  • But there is something more than this in the temper of which I am speaking. Cited from Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2, by George Hoar
  • He has a pleasant face, though I should think he has got a temper of his own. Cited from A Jacobite Exile, by G. A. Henty
  • But it happened that the director had a temper of his own. Cited from Steve Yeager, by William MacLeod Raine
  • It is not in the temper of the people either to give or to receive. Cited from Domestic Manners of the Americans, by Fanny Trollope
  • His non-appearance was no improvement to the temper of his wife. Cited from Verner's Pride, by Mrs. Henry Wood
  • The whole temper of his spirit was at once changed. Cited from The Knight of the Golden Melice, by John Turvill Adams
  • On the other hand, the temper of the rest of Germany must always be kept in mind. Cited from The War and Democracy, by Seton-Watson, Wilson, Zimmern and Greenwood
  • The whole temper of the man was painted in a dream of his youth. Cited from History of the English People, Volume I (of 8), by John Richard Green
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