swell of the ocean

35 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Although the storm was over and the wind had gone down, the swell of the ocean had not yet ceased to act. Cited from The Lifeboat, by R.M. Ballantyne
  • The ship only made her six knots as she pitched gently in the long swell of the ocean. Cited from Outward Bound, by Oliver Optic
  • It was then about eight o'clock in the morning, and the swell of the ocean was fast subsiding. Cited from The Pirate, by Frederick Marryat
  • The heat had been intense, as we had been floating upon the long smooth swell of the ocean, for there was but little wind. Cited from Typee, by Herman Melville
  • I can never forget their motion so full of grace and beauty, waving and undulating like the gentle swell of the ocean. Cited from The Nest in the Honeysuckles, and other Stories, by Various
  • Once when we reached a small hill dominating a village, I could see the cloud of smoke below me agitated like the ground swell of the ocean. Cited from Overland through Asia (Illustrated), by Thomas Wallace Knox
  • But deep down within him was there not a voice that, like the ground swell of the ocean, murmured ever one thing, unwearied, persistent? Cited from Bella Donna, by Robert Hichens
  • As the ship rose and fell with the swell of the ocean, the trees were now seen and now again lost sight of alternately for some time; this had a very curious effect. Cited from Ben Hadden, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • Light and heat differ as much as the short, choppy waves of the ocean and the slow, long swell of the ocean, but not more so. Cited from General Science, by Bertha M. Clark
  • The sea-mouth of the cave was protected from the full swell of the ocean by some huge detached rocks rising a little way offshore, which caught and broke the waves. Cited from Spanish Doubloons, by Camilla Kenyon
  • The long, slow swell of the ocean would correspond with the longer, slower waves which travel out from the sun, and which on reaching us are interpreted as heat. Cited from General Science, by Bertha M. Clark
  • Mild, sunny weather, with good breezes and a noble ship, that scarcely seemed to feel the deep swell of the ocean, bore us pleasantly on toward the desired port. Cited from Lizzy Glenn, by T.S. Arthur
  • The cove was not defended so much by the rocks above water, for the mouth of it was wide; but there appeared to be a ridge below, which broke off the swell of the ocean. Cited from Snarley-yow, by Frederick Marryat
  • Its rising and falling denoted the long heavy swell of the ocean, and the wash of water began to be more and more audible, as she settled into the sluggish swells. Cited from Homeward Bound, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • The ordinary swell of the ocean also acts with tremendous power upon a large tract, especially when it has been so thawed as to have become thin, and breaks it up into a thousand smaller pieces in a very short period. Cited from Thrilling Stories Of The Ocean, by Marmaduke Park
  • The absence of the swell of the ocean in sailing through this sea is striking, and gives the idea of navigating an extensive bay, on whose luxuriant islands no surf breaks. Cited from The Former Philippines thru Foreign Eyes, by Jagor, et al.
  • Wherefore these deviations in the swell of the ocean? Cited from The Man Who Laughs, by Victor Hugo
  • Gradually, these effects subsided, and when the discolored water again settled down to the long and regular swell of the ocean, the fish was seen, exhausted, and yielding passively to its fate. Cited from The Pilot, by J. Fenimore Cooper
  • The ship was bowed low on its side; and, as it entered each rolling swell of the ocean, a wide crescent of foam was driven ahead, as if the element gambolled along its path. Cited from The Red Rover, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • The rapidity with which this speck grew into a dense cloud, and spread itself in darkness over the heavens, as well as the increasing swell of the ocean before we felt the wind, soon convinced us he was right. Cited from A Voyage to the Moon, by George Tucker (AKA Joseph Atterley)
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