surly manner

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • He turned and approached, putting his hand to his hat in a half surly manner. Cited from Verner's Pride, by Mrs. Henry Wood
  • Next day he refused either to hunt or cut wood, spoke in a very surly manner, and threatened to leave us. Cited from Journey to the Polar Sea, 1819-22, Volume 2, by John Franklin
  • But her husband had been at home then and his surly manner quickly cut short the stranger's attempts at friendliness. Cited from The Best Short Stories of 1920, by Various
  • He was, therefore, left much to his own devices, which, from his surly manner, did not seem to be pleasant company. Cited from Adventures in Southern Seas, by George Forbes
  • "Does that matter?" he asked, in the same gruff and surly manner. Cited from The Bittermeads Mystery, by E. R. Punshon
  • The mate, whose name was Pierce, received me in a surly manner. Cited from Jack in the Forecastle, by John Sherburne Sleeper
  • There was a sort of stubborn surly manner about them, which I had never before witnessed in backwoodspeople. Cited from Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 346, August 1844, Vol. 56
  • He said good-morning to Horace in almost a surly manner, and Sylvia glanced from one to the other of the two men. Cited from The Shoulders of Atlas, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
  • His neighbor acceded to the proposition in a very surly manner, and for a considerable time seemed determined to find, or make some occasion for quarrel. Cited from Isaac T. Hopper, by L. Maria Child
  • I asked him in Welsh if I was in the right direction for Wrexham, he answered in a surly manner in English, that I was. Cited from Wild Wales by George Borrow
  • The women in the house seldom came in to see him, except when they brought him his meals; and then it was evident, from their surly manner, that they strongly objected to his presence. Cited from Through Three Campaigns, by G. A. Henty
  • They told me it was a great act of holiness, and added in a very surly manner, that if I did not like to see it I might go farther off, and desired me to go. Cited from Life of William Carey, by George Smith
  • One day when the quarreling had been much more violent than usual and each of the Sons was moping in a surly manner, he asked one of them to bring him a bundle of sticks. Cited from The AEsop for Children, by AEsop
  • Dean Swift, standing one morning at the window of his study, observed a decent old woman offer a paper to one of his servants, which the fellow at first refused in an insolent and surly manner. Cited from Irish Wit and Humor, by Anonymous
  • So when morning came, the giant went to them in a surly manner, and seeing they still ached with the stripes he had given them, he told them to poison themselves, for they would never get away from him in any other way. Cited from Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12), by Various
  • Then he remembered Basham's revengeful looks, and the surly manner of several of the hands, and finally agreed with his brother that it would be wiser to go armed, and keep together. Cited from The Gilpins and their Fortunes, by William H. G. Kingston
  • If he had said that an awkward and surly manner, no matter what virtues it concealed, was the greatest bar to ultimate mundane success, it would have been quite true, though perhaps not particularly edifying. Cited from At Large, by Arthur Christopher Benson
  • I should have to put a good face on the matter, and allow him to join me, or rather I should have to join him myself, if I did not wish to sleep in the open air and with an empty stomach, and so I went up to him, and asked my way in a half-surly manner. Cited from The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume III (of 8), by Guy de Maupassant
  • While they went about the work, however, they could not help remarking the unusually morose and surly manner of their master, and expressed the opinion that he was already troubled with that mental complaint to which we give the name of remorse. Cited from Red Rooney, by R.M. Ballantyne
  • He was an unpopular man in East Kent and he knew it, doing nothing to counterbalance the unpleasing impression caused invariably by his surly manner, and his sarcastic, often violent, temper. Cited from The Nest of the Sparrowhawk, by Baroness Orczy
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