standard anatomical position

17 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Info Because animals can change orientation with respect to their environment, and because appendages (arms, legs, tentacles, etc.) can change position with respect to the main body, it is important that positional descriptive terms refer to the organism when it is in its standard anatomical position.
  • In standard anatomical position, the human body is standing erect and at rest.
  • The action refers to the action of each muscle from the standard anatomical position.
  • In standard anatomical position in humans, these correspond to the head and feet.
  • Like other animals, its appendages move, and in this image are not in a standard anatomical position.
  • Anatomical terms used to describe location are based on a body positioned in what is called the standard anatomical position.
  • The male was also not "cut" while in standard anatomical position, so the cuts through his arms are oblique.
  • All descriptions are with respect to the organism in its standard anatomical position, even when the organism in question has appendages in another position.
  • In standard anatomical position, the palms of the hands face anteriorly.
  • However, other terms are used for direction in the appendages, given the unique position of the limbs (in standard anatomical position) in humans.
  • Thus, all descriptions are with respect to the organism in its standard anatomical position, even when the organism in question has appendages in another position.
  • For that reason, when considering any organism, the other two axes are considered to be relative to the appendage when in standard anatomical position.
  • Standard anatomical position is rigidly defined for human anatomy.
  • For one reason, this is because humans have a different neuraxis and, unlike animals that rest on four limbs, humans are considered when describing anatomy as being in the standard anatomical position.
  • It is also called the antecubital fossa because it lies anteriorly to the elbow (Latin cubitus) when in standard anatomical position.
  • In the standard anatomical position, the forearms are supinated, which means that the palms are facing forward, and the thumbs are pointing away from the body.
  • Because animals can change orientation with respect to their environment, and because appendages like limbs and tentacles, can change position with respect to the main body, positional descriptive terms need to refer to the animal as in its standard anatomical position.
  • In standard anatomical position (with the upper limb hanging alongside the body), the central components (II, III, and IV) lie lateral to the axis of abduction and therefore contribute to abduction from the start of the movement while the other components (I, V, VI, and VII) then act as adductors.