stain Gram

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The organism stains Gram-negative, although it has a Gram-positive cell structure.
  • Although the organism stains Gram-negative, it shows a Gram-positive cell structure.
  • RNA trees place the heliobacteria among the Firmicutes but they do not stain gram-positively.
  • The bacteria are rod-shaped and stain Gram-negative, although the cell structure is Gram-positive.
  • It stains Gram negative and has been successfully cultured on chocolate agar and sheep blood agar.
  • The cells stain Gram positive, although its cell envelope is unusual and is reminiscent of the cell walls of Gram negative bacteria.
  • Cells are oval-shaped, non-motile and stain Gram-negative.
  • The members of the phylum stain Gram-negative as they possess a thin peptidoglycan in between two lipid bilayers, albeit both peculiar.
  • These organisms stain Gram negative and are morphologically diverse having rod, cocci, filamentous and oddly shaped cells.
  • C. tetani is a rod-shaped, obligate anaerobe which stains Gram positive in fresh cultures; established cultures may stain Gram negative.
  • T. mathranii stains Gram-variable, but is structurally Gram-positive.
  • In cultures of bacillus, Butyrivibrio, and Clostridium, a decrease in peptidoglycan thickness during growth coincides with an increase in the number of cells that stain gram-negative.
  • When grown under elevated hydrostatic pressure, the cells are rod-shaped with a sheath-like outer structure, motile, have a mean length of 1-1.5 mum and stain Gram-negative.
  • A few, however, such as Megasphaera, Pectinatus, Selenomonas and Zymophilus, have a porous pseudo-outer-membrane that causes them to stain Gram-negative.
  • A number of other bacteria that are bounded by a single membrane, but stain gram-negative due to either lack of the peptidoglycan layer (viz., mycoplasmas) or their inability to retain the Gram stain because of their cell wall composition, also show close relationship to the gram-positive bacteria.
  • A number of other bacteria which are bounded by a single membrane but stain Gram-negative due to either lack of the peptidoglycan layer (viz., mycoplasmas) or their inability to retain the Gram-stain due to their cell wall composition, also show close relationship to the gram-positive bacteria.
  • Some Bacillaceae, such as the genera Filobacillus, Lentibacillus, and Halobacillus, stain Gram-negative or Gram-variable, but are known to have a Gram-positive cell wall.
  • Some bacteria, such as Deinococcus, which stain gram-positive due to the presence of a thick peptidoglycan layer and also possess an outer cell membrane are suggested as intermediates in the transition between monoderm (gram-positive) and diderm (gram-negative) bacteria.
  • Some bacteria such as Deinococcus, which stain gram-positive due to the presence of a thick peptidoglycan layer, but also possess an outer cell membrane are suggested as intermediates in the transition between monoderm (gram-positive) and diderm (gram-negative) bacteria.
  • These belong to the class Mollicutes (alternatively considered a class of the phylum Tenericutes), which lack peptidoglycan (gram-indeterminate), and the class Negativicutes, which includes Selenomonas and stain gram-negative.

How stain Gram gets used