squid giant axon

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  • Info The squid giant axon is the very large (up to 1 mm in diameter; typically around 0.5 mm) axon that controls part of the water jet propulsion system in squid. more...
  • The most successful and widely used model of neurons, the Hodgkin-Huxley model, is based on data from the squid giant axon.
  • He discovered the squid giant axon and the corresponding squid giant synapse.
  • During this time, Vale visited the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole so he could study this question in the squid giant axon.
  • Through use of voltage clamp techniques on a squid giant axon, they discovered that excitable tissues generally exhibit the phenomenon where a certain membrane potential must be reached in order to fire an action potential.
  • The squid giant axon, which is specialized to conduct signals very rapidly, is close to 1 millimetre in diameter, the size of a small pencil lead.
  • The Hodgkin-Huxley Model of an action potential in the squid giant axon has been the basis for much of the current understanding of the ionic bases of action potentials.
  • In fact, there are examples of neurons forming even tighter coupling: the squid giant axon arises from the fusion of multiple axons.
  • The most successful and widely used models of neurons have been based on the Markov kinetic model developed from Hodgkin and Huxley's 1952 work based on data from the squid giant axon.
  • Such neurons appear most commonly in the fast escape systems of various species -- the squid giant axon and squid giant synapse, used for pioneering experiments in neurophysiology because of their enormous size, both participate in the fast escape circuit of the squid.
  • Indeed, JZ Young, Professor of Anatomy, 1945-74, discovered and was the first to investigate the squid giant axon.
  • In 1938, Alan Lloyd Hodgkin came to the MBL to learn about the squid giant axon from Cole.
  • Much of what is known about axonal function comes from studying the squid giant axon, an ideal experimental preparation because of its relatively immense size (0.5-1 millimeters thick, several centimeters long).
  • In their Nobel Prize-winning work uncovering ionic mechanism of action potentials, Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley performed experiments on the squid giant axon.
  • As the drosophila fly is to genetics, or the squid giant axon, is to neurobiology, the star-nosed mole may be the model organism for tactile transduction.
  • The squid giant axon was the first preparation that could be used to voltage clamp a transmembrane current, and it was the basis of Hodgkin and Huxley's pioneering experiments on the properties of the action potential.
  • For example, action potentials move at roughly the same speed (25 m/s) in a myelinated frog axon and an unmyelinated squid giant axon, but the frog axon has a roughly 30-fold smaller diameter and 1000-fold smaller cross-sectional area.
  • The MBL has been a magnet for the discipline since L.W. Williams in 1910 discovered, and John Zachary Young in 1936 rediscovered, the squid giant axon, a nerve fiber that is 20 times larger in diameter than the largest human axon.
  • Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley also employed the squid giant axon (1939) and by 1952 they had obtained a full quantitative description of the ionic basis of the action potential, leading the formulation of the Hodgkin-Huxley model.
  • It is a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations that were introduced by Alan Lloyd Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley in 1952 to explain the results of voltage clamp experiments on the squid giant axon.