so fickle

50 examples (0.03 sec)
  • I did not expect to find you so fickle towards me and mine. Cited from The Letters of Cicero, Volume 1, by Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • So fickle did legislation become that no one could say one day what the House would do the next. Cited from Proportional Representation Applied To Party Government, by Ashworth
  • Or was his visual memory so fickle that he had forgotten what she was like? Cited from Alec Forbes of Howglen, by George MacDonald
  • Do you believe that either warrior is so fickle that he has entirely deserted the cause for which he fought? Cited from Comic History of the United States, by Bill Nye
  • The Romans found them so fickle and troublesome that they were all reduced in one little war after another. Cited from Young Folks' History of Rome, by Charlotte Mary Yonge
  • I never would have guessed him to be so fickle. Cited from The Disentanglers, by Andrew Lang
  • These troops who had been so fickle and jealous of their rights were unwilling to share the leader's disgrace. Cited from Fight for a Free Sea: A Chronicle of the War of 1812, by Ralph D. Paine
  • He wondered why it was his lot to be so fickle and incapable of loyalty. Cited from We Can't Have Everything, by Rupert Hughes
  • Who shall come and cast it in his teeth, and tell him it is a shame for him to be so fickle and so false of his promise? Cited from Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation, by Thomas More
  • "Do you think I am so fickle as that, Florence?" she asked, and her tone was a little hurt. Cited from Half a Dozen Girls, by Anna Chapin Ray
  • In the month of May, so variable, so fickle, in my part of the world, we can hardly ever count on a whole day of fine weather. Cited from The Mason-Bees, by J. Henri Fabre
  • Electors are not so fickle as an irrational method of voting made them appear to be. Cited from Proportional Representation, by John H. Humphreys
  • I must not seem so fickle and inconstant. Cited from Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327, February 1843, Vol. 53
  • How came Lord Bateman to be so fickle? Cited from The Valet's Tragedy et al, by Andrew Lang
  • So fickle is popular favor that when the crowd saw that nothing happened, they spurned the god loudly before whom they had grovelled in the dust till then. Cited from Hero Tales of the Far North, by Jacob A. Riis
  • So fickle is public favour: the man who is held in high estimation to-day, may, by one unfortunate action, become the object of contempt to-morrow. Cited from History of England in Three Volumes, Vol. III, by E. Farr & E. H. Nolan
  • So fickle his moods, so versatile his genius, so quick to creation his fancy, that he never knows what his next composition will be till the second that it is begun. Cited from Over the Pass, by Frederick Palmer
  • People are so fickle, so selfish, so inconsiderate. Cited from Hunted Down, by Charles Dickens
  • For some days there had been alternate winds and calms, and the weather was so fitful and so fickle that no one could tell in one hour what would happen in the next. Cited from Cord and Creese, by James de Mille
  • A man who has held down a cane-bottom chair conscientiously for fifteen years looks askance at so fickle a thing as a canoe twenty-nine inches in the beam. Cited from Crooked Trails, by Frederic Remington
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