Slavery Abolition Act

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  • The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 was passed and this made slavery illegal throughout the empire.
  • After the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 he was paid a large amount of compensation for the loss of slaves.
  • When abolition became inevitable, he was called on to draw up the Slavery Abolition Act passed in 1833.
  • Four years later, in 1835, the Slavery Abolition Act was read from the stone archway of the building.
  • Elizabeth Heyrick never lived to see the passing of the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
  • He was brought home to advise the government of administrative problems relating to the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
  • He was responsible for steering the Slavery Abolition Act through Parliament and in his third administration the Second Reform Bill was passed.
  • He was instrumental in implementing the slavery abolition act.
  • The church relinquished its slaveholdings only after the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833.
  • It was not until the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 that the institution finally was abolished.
  • Britain followed this with the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 which freed all slaves in the British Empire.
  • Additionally, the courts have, at least since the Slavery Abolition Act 1833, refused to grant specific performance of contracts involving personal services.
  • This campaign, and public pressure, led to the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833, though it contained compromises which they disliked.
  • He continued to campaign for the abolition of slavery in the British Empire, which he lived to see in the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
  • The results of these inquiries contributed greatly to the abolition of slavery with the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
  • Men, women and children who were already enslaved in the British Empire remained slaves, however, until Britain passed the Slavery Abolition Act in 1833.
  • The Act remained in force until 1833 when the British Parliament's Slavery Abolition Act abolished slavery in most parts of the British Empire.
  • The Act remained in force until 1833 when the British Parliament's Slavery Abolition Act finally abolished slavery in all parts of the British Empire.
  • They believed it had offered them no protection against raids by the native blacks, no redress, and by the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 freed their slaves.
  • Although the slave trade was suppressed, slavery continued in various parts of the British Empire until it was abolished by the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
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