satisfactory footing

27 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Thus I put my family matters on a peaceful and satisfactory footing. Cited from The Seven Great Monarchies, Vol 6. (of 7): Parthia, by George Rawlinson
  • As he was quite familiar with horses, Harry soon arranged matters on a more satisfactory footing. Cited from What Might Have Been Expected, by Frank R. Stockton
  • It placed the relations of the two empires on a very satisfactory footing. Cited from Peter the Great, by Jacob Abbott
  • But how is this Government, so occupied and so embarrassed, to be expected to put the police on a satisfactory footing? Cited from Speeches on Public Policy, V1, by John Bright
  • Boulte has put their relationship on a most satisfactory footing. Cited from Under the Deodars, by Rudyard Kipling
  • Between Sparta and Athens themselves matters were far from being on a satisfactory footing. Cited from A Smaller History of Greece, by William Smith
  • A few fatherly words from the prince of modern coaches soon had the desired effect of placing matters on a more completely satisfactory footing. Cited from Punch, Vol. 102, April 2, 1892, ed. by Sir Francis Burnand
  • With all the Governments on this continent our relations, it is believed, are now on a more friendly and satisfactory footing than they have ever been at any former period. Cited from Messages and Papers of the Presidents: James Knox Polk, by Richardson
  • It was quite evident that it was fever; but a doctor's word for it put everything on a comfortable and satisfactory footing. Cited from Aladdin O'Brien, by Gouverneur Morris
  • This I think is so but I would not wish to be taken as saying that religion, on that account, stands on a satisfactory footing in the States. Cited from North America, Vol. 1, by Anthony Trollope
  • One might suppose that he would be anxious to put his publishing business on the most secure and satisfactory footing; to facilitate sale, and to ensure profit. Cited from The Life of John Ruskin, by W. G. Collingwood
  • The same Parliament put the financial position of the monarch on a satisfactory footing by granting him a tenth penny of all rents. Cited from An Outline of the Relations ... England & Scotland, 500-1707, by Rait
  • This act, the result of long discussion and negotiation, places our commercial relations with the great Oriental Empire on a more satisfactory footing than they have ever heretofore enjoyed. Cited from Complete State of the Union Addresses
  • Having thus established her Adonis on a satisfactory footing, she broke out all over graciousness again, and, smiling and chatting, led her guests beneath the hospitable roof. Cited from Love Me Little, Love Me Long,by Charles Reade
  • She waited until they came home, and then, dressing her hair in a style which owed something to a fashion-paper and something to her lack of skill, sallied out to put matters on a more satisfactory footing. Cited from Salthaven, by W. W. Jacobs
  • Varahran therefore hastened to make peace with Rome, and, having so done, proceeded to give his attention to Armenia, with the view of placing matters there on a satisfactory footing. Cited from Seven Great Monarchies, Vol 7. (of 7): New Persian Empire, by Rawlinson
  • In a very short time he would have need of money; he had been disbursing freely, and could not face the responsibilities of the election, without assurance that his finances would soon be on a satisfactory footing. Cited from Our Friend the Charlatan, George Gissing
  • My opinion now is, that it would have been better if the Act had been enforced as it originally stood; and I believe the thing will never be on a satisfactory footing as long as agents who are merchants continue to act as agents. Cited from Second Shetland Truck System Report, by Guthrie
  • This activity was sustained the arsenals were replenished, the material of every kind was put on a satisfactory footing, the artillery reorganized, and ten thousand trained gunners drilled and maintained. Cited from The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783, Alfred Thayer Mahan
  • He decided to maintain the religious system that had descended to him from his ancestors, and turned a deaf ear to persuasions that would have led him to revolutionize the religious opinion of the East without placing it upon a satisfactory footing. Cited from Seven Great Monarchies, Vol 7. (of 7): New Persian Empire, by Rawlinson
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