Ripple Rock

19 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Info Ripple Rock was an underwater mountain with two peaks (9 feet and 21 feet below the surface) in the Seymour Narrows of the Discovery Passage in British Columbia, Canada, a part of the marine trade route from Vancouver and coastal points north. more...
  • Even after Ripple Rock was removed, it remains a challenging route.
  • There are several differences between the vinyl and CD releases of Ripple Rock.
  • Ripple Rock was a submerged twin-peak mountain that lay just nine feet beneath the surface of Seymour Narrows.
  • Vancouver band The Evaporators wrote a song about the event and released it on their 2004 album Ripple Rock.
  • This explosive was used in the removal of Ripple Rock.
  • Vancouver based punk rock band the Evaporators' 2004 album was named after Ripple Rock and includes a song that details its history and destruction.
  • The first attempts at planting explosive charges on Ripple Rock were made with floating drilling barges with the goal of blasting the rock into pieces.
  • The first song recorded about the blasting of Ripple Rock was named "Ripple Rock" and was recorded by Canadian folk and country singer Stu Davis.
  • As early as 1931, a marine commission recommended removing Ripple Rock, but it was not until 1942 that the government authorized attempts to remove it.
  • The Evaporators reference The Brothers-in-Law in their song Gerda Musinger (about the woman of the same name) from the album Ripple Rock.
  • In the 1860s a plan was started to link Vancouver Island to the mainland at Bute Inlet, using Ripple Rock to support the bridge.
  • Then, slowly and with great seamanship and care, the smaller Union vessel nudged the Prince Rupert off Ripple Rock and began to tow her towards Deep Cove, a mile distant.
  • The first known large ship to fall prey to Ripple Rock was the sidewheel steamer Saranac in 1875, as it was heading north to Alaska.
  • The bay was the site of a Bloedel, Stewart and Welch railroad logging camp in the 1930s, and adjacent to Ripple Rock.
  • The first program shown on channel 7 was the explosion of Ripple Rock, a hazard to navigation in Seymour Narrows, British Columbia.
  • But when, in the early morning mist of that August day in 1927, the Cardena came upon the Prince Rupert stuck fast, Ripple Rock was a scant two fathoms below the surface.
  • Ripple Rock, an undersea double pinnacle that sank more than 100 vessels (and cost as many lives) over the years, was obliterated by a man-made explosion on April 5, 1958.
  • The show premiered on April 5, 1958, as the second program ever broadcast by KIRO-TV, the first being a telecast of the explosion of Ripple Rock in Seymour Narrows, British Columbia, Canada.
  • She operated in that region until she was wrecked at 8.40 am on 18 June 1875 on the submerged Ripple Rock in Seymour Narrows off Campbell River, British Columbia, while on a mission to collect natural curiosities for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition.