rim brakes

46 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Many other modern features were incorporated such as rim-brakes.
  • The light weight of rim brakes also makes them desirable in road racing bicycles.
  • It can have no brake, or it can have one or two hand-activated rim brakes.
  • To make a rim brake lock the wheel as firmly as possible a number of techniques are used.
  • Hydraulic rim brakes are one of the least common types.
  • Most road bicycles use rim brakes, but some use disk brakes.
  • Adapters are available to allow the use of one type of lever with an otherwise incompatible type of rim brake.
  • Unlike some rim brake designs, disc brakes are compatible with front and rear suspension.
  • Rim brakes also heat the rim because the brake functions by converting kinetic energy into thermal energy.
  • Rim brakes are inexpensive, light, mechanically simple, easy to maintain, and powerful.
  • Various types of brake calipers are also used on bicycle rim brakes.
  • The moderate performance advantage (greater power and control) they offer over cable actuated rim brakes is offset by their greater weight and complexity.
  • The landing gear features a steerable nose wheel with a bicycle-style rim brake.
  • For most rim-brake bicycles, the dish will be symmetrical on the front wheel.
  • Drum brakes are heavier, more complicated, and often weaker than rim brakes, but they require less maintenance.
  • Disc brake assemblies are heavier than rim brakes, and are generally more expensive.
  • The use of very wide tyres favours disc brakes, as rim brakes require ever-longer arms to clear the wider tyre.
  • UHMWPE sheet is also cut into small blocks to be used as a brake pad material for mountain bike trials rim brakes.
  • In the late 1890s came the introduction of rim brakes and the freewheel.
  • Enclosed drum brakes or a rear coaster brake are used on most European city bikes, rather than rim brakes.
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