retardations

All Noun
20 examples (0.01 sec)
  • The Parliament of Paris put in the way of its registration retardations which seemed to forebode a refusal. Cited from A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times, V.5 of 6, by Guizot
  • The resulting court-ordered agreements formed the basis for federal minimum standards for the care of people with mental illness or mental retardations who reside in institutional settings.
  • When all types and subjects are thus combined the summation of these inconstant retardations presents sharply differentiated terms and a curve uninverted at any point. Cited from Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1, by Various
  • Calculations were undertaken as to the result of all the accelerations and retardations by the attractions of all the planets for the next seventy-five years. Cited from Recreations in Astronomy, by Henry Warren
  • If, therefore, the motor series in general parallels the auditory, the retardations below the actual metronome rate must be compensated by periods of acceleration above it. Cited from Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1, by Various
  • On the other side (21) is written, in Beethoven's hand, instructions on the use of the fourth in retardations, with five musical examples. Cited from Beethoven's Letters 1790-1826, Vol. 1 of 2, by Lady Wallace
  • As a result of the contamination, many had been born with birth defects, including cleft lip and palate, a missing ear, slight retardations and many more.
  • But it is not merely the sun which was observed to vary in the speed of its orbital progress; the moon and the planets also show curious accelerations and retardations of motion. Cited from A History of Science, V 1, by Henry Smith Williams
  • This cantilene begins on a weak beat, and produces numerous suspensions, which, in view of the time of their entrance, appear as so many retardations and delayals of melodic tones. Cited from Chopin: The Man and His Music, by James Huneker
  • In 1963, he was awarded the Joseph P. Kennedy International Award for "outstanding contributions and leadership in the field of mental retardations."
  • Subsequent and more exact calculations fail to find any retardations in at least two revolutions between 1865 and [Page 131] 1871. Cited from Recreations in Astronomy, by Henry Warren
  • Happily he was able to resist the descending impetus: the knots of the splicings furnished a succession of retardations. Cited from Notebook of an English Opium-Eater,de Quincey
  • Among the former were the successive retardations of seasons in successive descents, amounting to about four months at the depth of 25 feet; and the successive diminutions of the annual range of temperature. Cited from Autobiography of Sir George Biddell Airy, by George Biddell Airy
  • The graduations, retardations, accelerations of Solness's self-revealment are managed with the subtlest art, so as to keep the interest of the spectator ever on the stretch. Cited from The Master Builder, by Henrik Ibsen
  • The place of Saturn, when all the retardations have accumulated for 450 years, is one degree behind what it is computed if they are not considered; and 450 years later it will be one degree before its computed place -- a perturbation of two degrees. Cited from Recreations in Astronomy, by Henry Warren
  • Pulling out his tablets, he reviewed his calculations regarding the motion of projectiles, their velocities, ranges and paths, their retardations and their accelerations, jotting down the figures with a rapidity wonderful to behold. Cited from All Around the Moon, by Jules Verne
  • Taking advantage of these results, Italian-born French engineer Henri Pitot afterwards showed that the retardations arising from friction are inversely as the diameters of the pipes in which the fluid moves.
  • Literature would be a language which dispenses with gesture, facial expression, tone of voice; which is, in its halts, accelerations and retardations, emphases and concessions, the apotheosis of conversation. Cited from The Psychology of Beauty, by Ethel D. Puffer
  • Not that we would have Shakspeare's metre tinkered where it seems defective, but that we would not have palpable gaps defended as intentional by the utterly unsatisfactory assumption of pauses and retardations. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 3, No. 16, February, 1859, by Various
  • A comet that has an elliptic orbit may have it changed to [Page 128] parabolic by the accelerations of its speed, by attracting planets; or a parabolic comet may become elliptic, and so permanently attracted to the system by the retardations of attracting bodies. Cited from Recreations in Astronomy, by Henry Warren
Root form of retardations is retardation for the noun.

Meaning of retardations

  • noun The extent to which something is delayed or held back
  • noun Lack of normal development of intellectual capacities