retard its

53 examples (0.01 sec)
  • Does evil so react upon good, as not only to retard its motion, but to change its nature? Cited from Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. II. (of 12), by Burke
  • How could she shut it up in its dark cocoon and retard its transformation? Cited from Jacqueline by Th. Bentzon (Mme. Blanc), v1
  • I have since thought, that it touched the bottom, which caused it to turn, as well as retarded its movement. Cited from Satanstoe, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • If the food is placed near the top first, the heated air will be likely to press it down and retard its rising. Cited from Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1
  • The greatest glory that our generals and soldiers can claim is that they retarded its accomplishment so long. Cited from Bearn and the Pyrenees, by Louisa Stuart Costello
  • Very high speed is generally a delusion, and either results in indifferent work, or actually retards its progress. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 598, June 18, 1887, by Various
  • The presence of a grain of sand in a watch will retard its movements, if not arrest them altogether. Cited from The Royal Road to Health, by C.A. Tyrrell
  • Fresh air and sanitary surroundings only check the spread and retard its progress. Cited from Common Diseases of Farm Animals, by R. A. Craig
  • But a heavy meal, taken at about the same time as the poison, might retard its effects, though hardly to that extent. Cited from The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
  • Donald told George he must not think of going back with the rescuing party, as his weakness would retard its progress. Cited from The Lure of the Labrador Wild, by Dillon Wallace
  • The distance, however, of some of them and indispensable previous arrangements may have retarded its commencement in some of its parts. Cited from A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, Richardson
  • The expedition of Edward to Flanders lost its best chance of success through the events which retarded its despatch. Cited from The History of England, by T.F. Tout
  • If it has life enough it will stand; if it refuse light, such persons only retard its progress, although strictly conscientious in their position. Cited from Dawn, Mrs. Harriet A. Adams
  • What had so long retarded its promised blossoms? Cited from The Caxtons, by E. B. Lytton, Part 10
  • This same care for the dialog would retard its production; and critical revision would enforce still further delay. Cited from The Autobiography of a Play, by Bronson Howard
  • A mournful cavalcade followed in the train of the British army, and retarded its progress. Cited from The Life of Francis Marion, by W. Gilmore Simms
  • One can truly ask one's self whether the whole world does not desire war and is trying merely to retard its declaration a little in order to gain time. Cited from New York Times Current History: The European War, Jan 9, 1915, Vol. 1
  • The bigotry of medical science, even after its efficacy was known and proved, for a long time retarded its dissemination. Cited from Lippincott's Magazine, January 1873, Vol. 11, Nol. 22, by Various
  • To prevent this tree from growing, the school children, even to this day, nip the upper branches, and thus retard its upward growth. Cited from Welsh Folk-Lore, by Elias Owen
  • Treaties of alliance and marriages may somewhat retard its course, but never deflect it. Cited from Napoleon And Blucher, by Louise Muhlbach
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