resort to extreme measures

19 examples (0.04 sec)
  • The police worked with patience, and never once lost their temper, although I expected every moment that they would resort to extreme measures. Cited from The Gold Hunter's Adventures, by William H. Thomes
  • I resolved, under the pressing circumstances, to resort to extreme measures. Cited from Mystery of the Yellow Room, by Gaston Leroux
  • Situated as Spain and the United States are, the latter has forborne to resort to extreme measures. Cited from Our War With Spain For Cuba's Freedom, by T. White
  • Some female soldiers struggled to adapt to military life, leading them to resort to extreme measures such as desertion or suicide.
  • She declared on this occasion that she would be perfectly happy in the coach with the dear horses, and poppa had to resort to extreme measures. Cited from A Voyage of Consolation, by Sara Jeannette Duncan
  • But since it becomes quickly apparent that the man means to kill her, Grace is forced to resort to extreme measures to stay alive while putting her memory back together.
  • Gradually, the man and woman fall in love as they try to figure out what has led to their imprisonment, and together they resort to extreme measures to break out of the dream.
  • If you wish me to resort to extreme measures to "get" him, kindly give me carte blanche, and guarantee me protection in case of trouble. Cited from The Air Trust, by George Allan England
  • The Remonstrant cities of Holland were still for resistance, and attempts were made to influence the stadholder not to resort to extreme measures. Cited from History of Holland, by George Edmundson
  • In gratifying thus his selfish ambition he drained the resources of his kingdom, and was therefore obliged to resort to extreme measures to replenish his treasury. Cited from The Makers and Teachers of Judaism, by Charles Foster Kent
  • It is equally well known that not more than one-fourth or one-fifth of the Democratic Senators are in favor of such repeal, and they will resort to extreme measures to prevent it. Cited from Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet, Sherman
  • A note on the margin of the Prince's letter, directed the citizens to kindle four beacon fires in specified places, as soon as it should prove necessary to resort to extreme measures. Cited from Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1573 by Motley
  • His voice was threatening, and his officers understood that their general was prepared to resort to extreme measures, and they rejoiced over it, for the viceroy was always haughty and overbearing in his manner toward them, and they all hated him. Cited from Mohammed Ali and His House, by Louise Muhlbach
  • Rather than resort to extreme measures again, however, the United States invoked the cooperation of the Hispanic republics and proposed a conference to devise some solution of the Mexican problem. Cited from Hispanic Nations of the New World, Wm. R. Shepherd
  • Mackenzie became so embittered by his defeat in 1836, and the unscrupulous methods by which it was accomplished, that he made up his mind that reform in government was not to be obtained except by a resort to extreme measures. Cited from Canada under British Rule 1760-1900, by John G. Bourinot
  • A larger section, it is true, believed nothing of the sort, but at the same time were so far from thinking that it would be necessary to resort to extreme measures that they were content to remain passive, and allow their more sanguine comrades to put their convictions to the test. Cited from The Transvaal from Within, by J. P. Fitzpatrick
  • He informed him, still in this wild, jerking scream, that he was a dog, that his mother's character was far from that of Caesar's wife, and that if more speed was not exhibited on this down grade, he would be forced to resort to extreme measures. Cited from Castilian Days, by John Hay
  • The prince directed the citizens to kindle four great beacon fires as soon as it should prove necessary to resort to extreme measures, and solemnly promised that as soon as the signal was given an inundation should be created which would sweep the whole Spanish army into the sea. Cited from By Pike and Dyke, Dutch Republic, by Henty
  • But Louise Van Burnam was not the woman to relinquish it till she had obtained the price she had put on it, and he becoming very soon aware of this fact, began to ask himself if he should not be obliged to resort to extreme measures in order to regain it. Cited from That Affair Next Door, by Anna Katharine Green