pudding-stone

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  • You can lie out on the naked rocks and look like a piece of pudding-stone. Cited from Just So Stories, by Rudyard Kipling
  • This appears evidently from the examination of our pudding-stone. Cited from Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4), by James Hutton
  • Here again, though we have not a regular pudding-stone, we have that which corresponds to it, as having been the effect of similar circumstances. Cited from Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4), by James Hutton
  • From its surface pudding-stone rocks crop out. Cited from Journal of Landsborough's Expedition from Carpentaria, by Landsborough
  • The rock here is a sort of sand or pudding stone; there is no limestone or granite. Cited from The Complete Writings of Charles Dudley Warner V4
  • It is constructed of a type of flint and ore known as pudding stone.
  • The rock on which we stood was a coarse conglomerate, or pudding stone. Cited from The Discovery of Yellowstone Park, by Nathaniel Pitt Langford
  • The exterior walls are of pudding stone, granite and blue stone blocks.
  • In dry seasons there is evidently none: the hills passed over this day were of a curious species of pudding-stone and freestone. Cited from Expeditions into New South Wales, by John Oxley
  • The facing was built of pudding stone, the spandrels filled with Roman concrete.
  • There was also a good deal of pudding-stone; but the bulk of the rock was this very hard, very flinty sandstone. Cited from First Year in Canterbury Settlement, Samuel Butler
  • This fact therefore of pudding-stone mountains, is a general fact, so far as it is founded upon observations that are made in Africa, Germany, and Britain. Cited from Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4), by James Hutton
  • Here, on the contrary, the mountain is one pudding-stone; and most of the fragments are stones much rounded by attrition. Cited from Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4), by James Hutton
  • But those injecting operations reach no farther up among the marl strata in this place; and then would appear to have been confined to the pudding-stone. Cited from Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4), by James Hutton
  • The rocks are pudding-stone and sandstone, and belong to the Porcupine Mountain development. Cited from Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes, by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
  • The strata here descend to the bottom of the river, which is above the place of the pudding-stone and vertical strata. Cited from Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4), by James Hutton
  • If your torch be waved in a chamber set round with bits of granite and slate and pudding-stone, you will get no luminous reverberation. Cited from Essays AEsthetical, by George Calvert
  • The crack was only an inch or so wide at the bottom, and twisted a good deal as it went up, for the rock was of the kind known as "pudding-stone." Cited from The Junior Classics, V8, Edited by W. Patten
  • This pudding-stone is composed of gravel formed of the hardest parts of the schistus and granite or porphyry mountains. Cited from Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4), by James Hutton
  • They consist of a fine white clayey sandstone, a white calcareous sandstone, and coarse sandstone or pudding-stone. Cited from Exploring Expedition to the Rockies, by Fremont
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