public censure

56 examples (0.04 sec)
  • There had been some talk of a public censure, but it died away. Cited from To Have and To Hold, by Mary Johnston
  • However in view of her previous good works, her punishment was limited to public censure.
  • Once, on the other hand, he earned his share of public censure. Cited from Memoir of Fleeming Jenkin, R. L. Stevenson
  • Nor did his majesty escape public censure on this occasion. Cited from History of England in Three Volumes, Vol. III, by E. Farr & E. H. Nolan
  • In the year 1727, they passed a public censure upon this trade. Cited from A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume II (of 3), by Thomas Clarkson
  • Both had left their spouses and children in order to live together and were the subject of relentless public censure.
  • Not much therefore was added by it to fame or envy, nor do I remember that it produced either public praise or public censure. Cited from Lives of the English Poets: Prior etc.
  • We may, therefore, conclude, that nothing tends so much to correct vice and folly as this species of public censure. Cited from A Lecture On Heads, by Geo. Alex. Stevens
  • "Sufficient to such a man is this punishment (rather, public censure) which was inflicted of many." Cited from Narrative of some of the Lord's Dealings with George M_ller, by Muller
  • His coadjutors in the great tragedy were not the kind of people to share any part of the public censure that could be reflected on to their gaoler. Cited from The Tragedy of St. Helena, by Walter Runciman
  • The rising tide of public censure, mounting to the foot of the throne itself, found no one to hold it back but a bewildered lock-keeper. Cited from The Schemes of the Kaiser, by Juliette Adam
  • Calhoun, the Secretary of War, who was specially annoyed because his instructions had not been followed, favored a public censure. Cited from The Reign of Andrew Jackson, by Frederic Austin Ogg
  • In discipline, stress was laid on the propriety and duty of private admonition, in its successive scriptural steps, before public censure. Cited from Mary S. Peake, by Lewis C. Lockwood
  • The simple mode of life above described did not save Washington from public censure by those who are always ready to carp at the doings of distinguished men, however unexceptionable their conduct may be. Cited from Life And Times Of Washington, V2, by Schroeder, &c
  • Or why could not the twenty-nine disapprobators have attended the meeting the second time and prevented your taking such measures from which they "are apprehensive the town will incur a great deal of public censure"? Cited from The Original Writings of Samuel Adams, Volume 2
  • As reprehensible as it may appear in retrospect, the incident did not arouse contemporary public censure nor bring into question the legitimacy of the coercive agents or their actions.
  • Such are the exigencies of partisan politics that republican leaders are teaching the strange doctrine that public censure should be directed against those who expose crime rather than against criminals who have committed the offenses.
  • Sir Danvers Osborn, who had been appointed governor of this province, died immediately after his arrival at New York, and the instructions he had received were exposed to public censure. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II, by Tobias Smollett
  • I've been a private, bunkie, such as privates seldom are, Borne my share of public censure, let it heal without a scar. Cited from Rhymes of the Rookies, by W. E. Christian
  • Russia, it is known, wished to fasten the blame for the revolution on Prince Alexander; but all public censure was vetoed by England. Cited from The Development of the European Nations, by John Holland Rose
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