public affront

19 examples (0.01 sec)
  • How can I put such a public affront upon her. Cited from Round The Red Lamp, By Arthur Conan Doyle
  • And besides all this, they were clearly little mile-stones on the path which led men to physical competency and the ability to protect their articles from public affront. Cited from Queed, by Henry Sydnor Harrison
  • She had no intention of submitting to the coarse hands and ropes of public affront. Cited from Linda Condon, by Joseph Hergesheimer
  • He reckoned on the Mayor taking some action that would stop the reception and thereby put a public affront on Boyce. Cited from The Red Planet, William J. Locke
  • Its tone was considered extremely discourteous; it contained no apology for the public affront offered to the British Government, and indicated no desire for improved relations. Cited from Forty-one years in India, by Frederick Sleigh Roberts
  • Harmodius having given offence to Hippias, the despot revenged himself by putting a public affront upon his sister. Cited from A Smaller History of Greece, by William Smith
  • In a few days, it appeared that the representations by which they had induced the King to put this gross and public affront on his mother were unfounded. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V1
  • Had he ever been tyrannical, harsh, unsympathetic even, that instead of coming to him as to their father and Master they should have put this public affront on him and appealed straight away to the Bishop? Cited from Brother Copas, by Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
  • "But may I presume to submit to your Majesty, that the public affront offered to the syndic should be repaired." Cited from Snarleyyow, or, the Dog Fiend, by Captain Frederick Marryat
  • Besides, he deserved a lesson, for if one does not like a prima donna's singing one can always be silent, but it is intolerable that a public affront should be put upon a pretty woman. Cited from The Adventures of Gerard, by Arthur Conan Doyle/14
  • Pausing here, she looked about her, right and left, then over her shoulder straight back at Selwyn; and as she stood in silence evidently awaiting him, it became impossible for him any longer to misunderstand without a public affront to her. Cited from The Younger Set, by Robert W. Chambers
  • His mind is no longer intent upon the affront to himself, the public affront in the presence of thirty thousand persons, nor upon the murderous insult that the Bey addressed to him in presence of his mortal enemies. Cited from The Nabob, Volume 1 (of 2), by Alphonse Daudet
  • Indeed the Burney family seem to have been apprehensive that some public affront such as the Doctor's unpardonable folly, to use the mildest term, had richly deserved, would be put upon him. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V2
  • Indeed, the Burney family seem to have been apprehensive that some public affront, such as the doctor's unpardonable folly, to use the mildest term had richly deserved, would be put upon'him. Cited from The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 1
  • It was so well known in Chapelizod that Sturk was poking after Lord Castlemallard's agency that Nutter felt the scene going on before his eyes between him and Dangerfield like a public affront. Cited from The House by the Church-Yard, by J. Sheridan Le Fanu
  • This bitter and public affront came to Sir Charles Blount's ear, at which he sent him a challenge; which was accepted by my lord, and they met near Marybone Park, where my lord was hurt in the thigh, and disarmed. Cited from Travels in England, and Fragmenta Regalia
  • There could be no thought of a reconciliation after such a deliberate and public affront as that inflicted upon Fennimore by Abellino; so they sent their seconds to each other, and it was arranged that they should fight the matter out in the large room of The Green Tree tavern. Cited from A Hungarian Nabob, by Maurus Jokai
  • The young man, mindful of the injury, persuaded the prince that this action was meant as a public affront, which it behoved him in honour to resent; and the choleric Robert, drawing his sword, ran upstairs, with an intention of taking revenge on his brothers [m]. Cited from The History of England, Volume I, by David Hume
  • I was choking with mingled anger and shame -- anger at my husband for permitting me to come to a place in which I could be exposed to a public affront from his cast-off mistress, shame at the memory of the pitiful scheme for entering into his life which had fallen to such a welter of wreck and ruin. Cited from The Woman Thou Gavest Me, by Hall Caine