proscription

All Noun
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  • Info Proscription is the public identification and official condemnation of enemies of the state. more...
  • This also being agreed to, three hundred persons were put to death by proscription. Cited from Plutarch's Lives, A. H. Clough,
  • The act was nothing less than a proscription of the whole nation. Cited from Irish Race in the Past and the Present, by Thebaud
  • The proscription against him had been long since taken off. Cited from The Bush Boys, by Captain Mayne Reid
  • No genius, no information, could save from proscription a book so written. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V2
  • No genius, no information, could have saved from proscription a book so written. Cited from Famous Reviews, Edited by R. Brimley Johnson
  • These two proscriptions are quite fundamental, and the first not less than the second. Cited from The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1, by Various
  • They knew that they must work under suspicion, even under proscription. Cited from The Oxford Movement, by R.W. Church
  • Name by name, dangerous men of the North are marked down for proscription or special action. Cited from The Little Lady of Lagunitas, Richard Henry Savage
  • This has surely much more the air of a table of proscription than an act of grace. Cited from Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IV. (of 12), by Burke
  • I cannot approve of proscriptions which thus fall upon a whole family, a whole class of people. Cited from The Empress Josephine, by Louise Muhlbach
  • Opposition to acts of power was to be marked by a kind of civil proscription. Cited from Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. I. (of 12), by Burke
  • He waited four months for his proscription to be lifted before returning to Paris.
  • Three thousand supporters were subsequently arrested and put to death in the proscriptions that followed.
  • His father was involved in the proscription but his mother escaped.
  • The proscription of the newspaper by the Castle came just in time.
  • It was his rare good fortune to share the triumph of his friends without having shared their proscription. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V2
  • Their next business was to put out of the way, by proscription, the enemies of this new order of things. Cited from The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 2, by Various
  • Then was there not the prospect of the proscription being taken off, and the two would be made happy? Cited from Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Vol. XXIII., by Various
  • If he considered victory, proscription, the dictatorship necessary, he at once demanded them. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • May not their hospitality to us have brought them under proscription? Cited from The Rifle Rangers, by Captain Mayne Reid
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