prey from the ground

18 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It takes its prey from the ground or in flight.
  • High-speed video shows these specialized teeth are used to pluck tiny prey from the ground.
  • They may also take prey from the ground, occasionally chasing it with a few hops.
  • They hunt by flycatching, or by taking prey from the ground like a shrike.
  • They flycatch or take prey from the ground.
  • It flycatches or take prey from the ground and is attracted to bush fires.
  • They can dig rapidly to extract their prey from the ground and bury prey remains in the sand for later consumption.
  • It flycatches or take prey from the ground.
  • They do, however, also eat their prey from the ground, and they often find inconspicuous places to perch while waiting for prey, such as utility lines and the like.
  • They occasionally fly to vegetation to glean an insect off it before returning to their perch, but they do not attempt to obtain prey from the ground.
  • They catch flying insects on the wing, making forays to catch its prey from the ground or a perch from a bush, tree, or large rock.
  • This is a gleaning bat, one which captures prey from the ground and from water surfaces.
  • Vireos take prey from leaves and branches and in midair, and the gray vireo takes 5 percent of its prey from the ground.
  • They may take prey from perches, snatch from tree foliage while in flight, chase while in flight, or swoop from the air and catch their prey from the ground or water below.
  • The Cape batis hunts by flycatching, or by taking prey from the ground like a shrike.
  • The pririt batis hunts by flycatching, or by taking prey from the ground like a shrike.
  • This species is primarily an insectivore that flies from a perch to catch prey from the ground or from foliage in the undergrowth, less often from branches and trunks, hardly ever in midair.
  • They take prey from leaves and branches; true vireos also flycatch, and the gray vireo takes 5 percent of its prey from the ground (Salaman & Barlow 2003).