presumptuous in me

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • That would be presumptuous in me, for I am not yet your candidate. Cited from The Ramrodders, by Holman Day
  • You think it is very presumptuous in me ever to have thought of it; but I did not think of it. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 75, January, 1864, by Various
  • That it is in effect Mr. Laicus, though it may seem somewhat presumptuous in me to say it. Cited from Laicus, by Lyman Abbott
  • It may therefore be deemed presumptuous in me to attempt so comprehensive a task, upon the meagre experience of a few short months. Cited from Herzegovina, by George Arbuthnot
  • With all my heart; if our father Adam is wrong, I am sure it would be presumptuous in me to be right; so drive me as fast as possible. Cited from Memorials and Other Papers V2,by Thomas de Quincey
  • No man is more capable than he of doing justice to any cause which he undertakes; and it would be most presumptuous in me to anticipate the defence which he means to set up. Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V4 of 4
  • It was foolish and presumptuous in me, hoping to appear in a French dress; but the idea would not have entered my head had it not been suggested to me. Cited from Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume II
  • It would be presumptuous to hope to be one of the three; but I do not think it was presumptuous in me to hope for some readers for my verse. Cited from Philip Gilbert Hamerton, Philip Gilbert Hamerton
  • Since the interest in this subject proves to be so wide-spread, I trust it will not be thought presumptuous in me to offer my own humble experience in this matter for what it is worth. Cited from Some Private Views, by James Payn
  • How much of this everyday stamina the Indians possess, it would be presumptuous in me, with so short an opportunity of observation, to decide. Cited from Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes, by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
  • It was not so very presumptuous in me (was it?) to hope -- When all his relations -- When he himself -- Yet what room for hope did he, could he, give me? Cited from The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Volume 4 (of 7), Samuel Richardson
  • He was a man of the highest gifts -- so truly many-sided, that it would be presumptuous in me to attempt to describe him, except under those aspects, in which he came before me. Cited from Apologia pro Vita Sua, by John Henry Newman
  • It would be presumptuous in me to make any remarks on the effect of this vibration on the human system; we shall all be anxious to hear what our Chairman has to say on this point. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 447,by Various
  • I never dreamed of offering advice; it would have been excessively presumptuous in me, especially as I have not the faintest interest in the subject we have been talking about. Cited from Sword and Gown, by George A. Lawrence
  • It seemed to me that it would be presumptuous in me, having no special knowledge in such matters, to go against the practically unanimous report of the United States Board of Engineers. Cited from Autobiography of Seventy Years, Vol. 1-2, by George Hoar
  • Perhaps I deserved this check; for it was rather presumptuous in me, an entire stranger, to express any doubt of the justice of his animadversion upon his old acquaintance and pupil. Cited from A Book of English Prose, by Percy Lubbock
  • It may be deemed presumptuous in me to pass an opinion upon one whose fame is world-wide; but that very fact must be my excuse, that those who are entitled to universal admiration are likewise subject to universal criticism. Cited from Herzegovina, by George Arbuthnot
  • Of Mr. Galt's fitness for the office of superintendent of the Canada Company, it would, perhaps, be considered presumptuous in me to give an opinion. Cited from Twenty-Seven Years in Canada West, by Samuel Strickland
  • My lords, it would be presumptuous in me to say more on this subject, having, I repeat, been made acquainted, only by accident, with the arrangements made preparatory to the campaign now brought under your lordships' attention. Cited from Maxims Of His Grace The Duke Of Wellington, by Wellington
  • Over some parts of the library, descended curtains of silk of various dyes, none of which I ever saw lifted while I was there; and I felt somehow that it would be presumptuous in me to venture to look within them. Cited from Phantastes, A Faerie Romance, George MacDonald #1
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