praise or censure

42 examples (0.02 sec)
  • They can praise or censure without reference to the differences which exist between them. Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V1 of 4
  • I have never tried again, and therefore will not hazard either praise or censure. Cited from Lives of Poets: Gay etc by Samuel Johnson
  • These records never contained a word of either praise or censure for Mogley. Cited from Tales From Bohemia, by Robert Neilson Stephens
  • All common exhibitions open lie, For praise or censure, to the common eye. Cited from Poetical Works, by Charles Churchill
  • With the author they must bear an equal burden of whatever of praise or censure shall entail. Cited from Cappy Ricks, by Peter B. Kyne
  • It is not a good nor a weighty book, nor does it deserve any great amount either of praise or censure. Cited from Yesterdays with Authors, by James T. Fields
  • There is nothing I scorn more, except those who think the ordinary sort of praise or censure is matter of the least consequence. Cited from The Journal of Sir Walter Scott, by Walter Scott
  • Then mayst thou praise or censure, just as it may please thee. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2
  • People are apt to praise or censure practices without enquiring into the nature of them. Cited from Laws, by Plato
  • And when either praise or censure stops, the object of it is apparently forgotten for a time, except by the few who are learned. Cited from Beacon Lights of History, Volume VII, by John Lord
  • The poet, interrupted, put his head between his hands and his elbows on the table, that he might not hear the noise either of praise or censure. Cited from Cinq Mars, by Alfred de Vigny, v5
  • The next class of his poems is called the Mistress, of which it is not necessary to select any particular pieces for praise or censure. Cited from Lives of the Poets, Vol. 1, by Samuel Johnson
  • We reckon this a greater novelty, than all the novelties which as a mere writer he ever put forth, whether for praise or censure. Cited from Autobiography, by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • REMARKS BY OFFICERS or soldiers upon others in the military service, whether praise or censure, public or private, written or spoken, is prohibited. Cited from Military Instructors Manual, by James P. Cole and Oliver Schoonmaker
  • But I have advanced no opinion either for praise or censure, other than as texts introductory to the reasons which compel me to form it. Cited from Biographia Literaria, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Not that one wishes either praise or censure to be stinted. Cited from The Art of Letters, by Robert Lynd
  • Peradventure Our very toil is a dream, And the works that we praise or censure, It may be, they only seem. Cited from The Poems of A.L. [Adam Lindsay] Gordon
  • To be totally indifferent to praise or censure is a real defect in character. Cited from English Grammar in Familiar Lectures, by Samuel Kirkham
  • Another circumstance which led to Dr. Johnson's indiscriminate praise or censure of Shakespeare, is the very structure of his style. Cited from Characters of Shakespeare's Plays, Wm. Hazlitt
  • To be totally indifferent to praise or censure, is a real defect in character. Cited from English Grammar in Familiar Lectures, by Samuel Kirkham
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