posterity than

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • I threw out a bottle of papers, less out of regard to posterity than to myself. ...
  • I don't know a book more certain to evaporate away from posterity than that, except it be supported by his other works.
  • Lord Chesterfield stands much lower in the estimation of posterity than he would have done if his letters had never been published. ...
  • There have been men who greatly influenced the life of their time, whose reputation has been much greater with posterity than it was with their contemporaries. ...
  • There is no more dangerous gift to posterity than a few cleverly turned platitudes. ...
  • There was, however, no need for doing so, and his reason for not doing it is more eloquent on his behalf with posterity than any pamphlet could be. ...
  • By his writings Rousseau acted more powerfully upon posterity than upon his own times: his personality had ceased to do his genius injustice. ...
  • No writer can leave a more precious legacy to posterity than this; and beside this shining merit, all mere literary splendors look pale and cold. ...
  • When the work of Mr. Hardy is completed, nothing, it is probable, will more strike posterity than its unity, its consistency. ...
  • There are few cases in which there is more disagreement between the judgment of contemporaries and that of immediate posterity than the case of the French Emperor. ...
  • The play contains a love episode due entirely to the youthful poet's imagination, but it contains fine passages as well, and seems to us to have merited more praise from posterity than it has received. ...
  • Again, are there not others who, by improper junction with persons diseased in body or vicious in mind, have entailed greater misery upon their posterity than I have on mine! ...
  • He thus comes to think more about posterity than about contemporaries; because, while the latter can only lead him astray, posterity forms the majority of the species, and time will gradually bring the discerning few who can appreciate him. ...
  • When du Maurier thought he recognised merely a passing "fashion" and hit out at it, he made far less interesting pictures for posterity than when he took the outward aspect of the age he lived in as being in the natural order of things. ...
  • Thus, as some voyager has said, the man who but drops one of these nuts into the ground may be said to confer a greater and more certain benefit upon himself and posterity than many a life's toil in less genial climes. ...
  • The privy council being called together pressed the king to pass the bill of attainder, saying there was no other way to preserve himself and his posterity than by so doing; and therefore he ought to be more tender of the safety of the kingdom than of any one person how innocent soever. ...
  • In the whole range of English history there is no monarch whose character has been more variously depicted by contemporaries or more strenuously debated by posterity than the "majestic lord who broke the bonds of Rome".
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