post-nuclear whorls

36 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The point where we find the hair whorl is the spot where the hair changes direction.
  • The shell of this species can be easily recognized by its low whorls.
  • The living chamber takes up slightly more than half a whorl.
  • It is in contact with the body whorl for only a short distance.
  • The body whorl takes up half of the total length.
  • They are held in whorls of five to eight at the end of each shoot.
  • The last mentioned of these is especially so on the earliest whorls.
  • The last whorl is slightly greater than one-third of the height of the shell.
  • The flowers grow in whorls that are a bit more separated than in their parents.
  • They often form a crown of two whorls of about seven fronds each.
  • The body whorl is almost equal to half the length of the shell.
  • Hair whorls have been discovered to be associated with brain development.
  • It is attached to the body whorl only for a short distance.
  • The numbers assigned to each print are based on whether or not they are whorls.
  • An opposite leaf pair can be thought of as a whorl of two leaves.
  • They grow in whorls beginning in summer until fall, with many flowers coming into bloom at the same time.
  • The very small shells of the species in this genus have many whorls.
  • One row about the middle of the whorl is slightly elevated above the others.
  • The shell has a high spire with the body whorl less than half the total length.
  • The last whorl is much larger than the others.
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