perishable nature

60 examples (0.03 sec)
  • They are things of a perishable nature, yet not without their value. Cited from A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, by Cornelius Tacitus
  • The perishable nature of man is here compared with the imperishable nature of God. Cited from The Great Doctrines of the Bible, by W. Evans
  • Raspberries, for instance, never become really cheap in the market because of their perishable nature. Cited from If You're Going to Live in the Country, by Ormsbee and Huntley
  • However, many tropical fruits cannot be shipped to the Northern States because of their perishable nature. Cited from Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
  • If they can be shipped alive to any point, they are perfectly safe to use, although quite high in price because of their perishable nature. Cited from Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 3
  • Now that he had issued his declaration of pecuniary independence, he began to appreciate the perishable nature of money. Cited from The Clarion, by Samuel Hopkins Adams
  • Nothing of a perishable nature, which cannot be restored in the same condition -- as milk, fruit, and the like, must be taken. Cited from The Book of Household Management, by Mrs. Isabella Beeton
  • Due to the perishable nature of wood material it is difficult to trace the usage of barrels in history.
  • Due to preparation requirements and perishable nature, chal has proved difficult to export.
  • In addition, the regular fading of the moon's appearance is also symbolic of the perishable nature of life.
  • An elder in the Church, he could administer to the soul as well as to the perishable nature of his patients. Cited from T. De Witt Talmage, by T. De Witt Talmage and Mrs. T. De Witt Talmage
  • Wooden and wicker containers were also used, although because of their perishable nature none was unearthed. Cited from New Discoveries at Jamestown, by John L. Cotter and J. Paul Hudson
  • Is her goodness and purity of such a perishable nature that she fears pollution? Cited from Bohemian Society, by Lydia Leavitt
  • Was he restrained by some prescient sense of the perishable nature of the material upon which he was expected to inscribe the record of his hopes? Cited from The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Vol. I, by Ambrose Bierce
  • From their perishable nature, they are used only when other materials cannot be procured, and where it is important to place the troops speedily under cover from the enemy's fire. Cited from Elements of Military Art and Science, by Henry Wager Halleck
  • The origins of the bullwhip are also a matter for debate and, given the perishable nature of leather, are likely to remain so.
  • With the perishable nature of the whole material creation the psalmist contrasts the imperishable nature of God. Cited from The Great Doctrines of the Bible, by W. Evans
  • There is no desire more deep-rooted in our perishable nature than that which asks for plenty of beef and mutton at low prices. Cited from Lost Leaders, by Andrew Lang
  • The cause of this is to be traced in the perishable nature of the sun-dried clay, of which the walls of the latter were composed. Cited from Ceylon; An Account of the Island. . ., Vol. 1 of 2, by Tennent
  • It consists in those things which nature produces only in certain quantities, and which being of a very perishable nature, it is impossible to accumulate together the produce of many different seasons. Cited from Wealth of Nations, by Adam Smith
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