perfunctory

All Adjective Noun
1,274 examples (0.04 sec)
  • He will probably go through his duties in a somewhat perfunctory manner. Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V4 of 4
  • The law has no claim against her, except in a perfunctory way. Cited from The Hollow of Her Hand, George Barr McCutcheon
  • He meant the hope, with these, only in the most general and perfunctory sense. Cited from Queed, by Henry Sydnor Harrison
  • The first call was brief and perfunctory, but he came the next day and the next. Cited from The Conqueror, by Gertrude Franklin Atherton
  • It was easy to see from his face that this was no mere perfunctory call. Cited from The Gerrard Street Mystery, by John Charles Dent
  • His actions, in all that related to his family, were of the most perfunctory kind. Cited from Sister Carrie, by Theodore Dreiser
  • Their conversation was perfunctory; they showed one another that they had no pleasure in it. Cited from Indian Summer, by William D. Howells
  • She was right also in her conclusion that all day long he hardly gave her more than a perfunctory thought. Cited from The Gray Dawn, by Stewart Edward White
  • Rose used almost to fancy herself at times a perfunctory husband on the other side of the fire. Cited from The Chaperon, by Henry James
  • The women remained, but with a slightly perfunctory air in most cases. Cited from In and Around Berlin, by Minerva Brace Norton
  • The lips lost their perfunctory smile and settled into determined lines. Cited from Across the Years, by Eleanor H. Porter
  • His manner was even more perfunctory than his words. Cited from The Henchman, by Mark Lee Luther
  • I cannot share in the feelings of those who would consider it formal or perfunctory. Cited from The Upton Letters, by Arthur Benson
  • Now he did both while he said good afternoon with perfunctory politeness. Cited from The Happy Family, by Bertha Muzzy Bower
  • Never before, perhaps, was prayer offered in a more familiar or less perfunctory manner. Cited from The Crew of the Water Wagtail, by R.M. Ballantyne
  • I took his hand: a doctor doing a perfunctory duty? Cited from The Heavenly Twins, by Madame Sarah Grand
  • The use of the stick he thought best to carry became perfunctory. Cited from Slippy McGee, Sometimes Known as the Butterfly Man, Marie Conway Oemler
  • When she saw that he was serious she wept a few more perfunctory tears and went. Cited from Indian Lily and Other Stories,by Hermann Sudermann
  • He had little to say save to thank them in a perfunctory manner. Cited from A Man and a Woman, by Stanley Waterloo
  • His notes were more and more perfunctory, until, at last, they ceased altogether. Cited from The Nine-Tenths, by James Oppenheim
  • Next »